Cannabis News

Trump’s New Communications Director Thinks Legal Weed Is Creating Cities Full of “Pot Zombies”

Anthony Scaramucci took the White House podium for the first time yesterday, and the internet spent the rest of the day digging up all the dirt they could find, including some reefer madness.

by Zach Harris

Sean Spicer is unemployed. The bumbling, stumbling White House Press Secretary officially resigned yesterday and was almost immediately replaced by self-described “American entrepreneur” and Trump golf buddy Anthony Scaramucci. But while “the Mooch” took the storied podium yesterday to tell the American public that Trump would be doing “a lot of winning,” everyone else was busy looking through Scaramucci’s old tweets to find out what really makes him tick.

And while Trump has been famously quick to disparage anyone who so much as looks at him funny, Scaramucci’s public opinions show that the New Yorker has tweeted in support of increased gun control, gay rights and Hillary Clinton’s competence. But while he may be a little more liberal-leaning than his predecessor, when it comes to weed, “the Mooch” is directly in line with Spicer, Sessions and the rest of the right wing’s fear mongering pot pariahs.

What they leave out is the the overuse of these drugs is creating a zombie apocalypse in their cities https://t.co/UowggluLvM

— Anthony Scaramucci (@Scaramucci) October 25, 2015

In a tweet from 2015, Scaramucci quoted a story from Bloomberg News predicting Washington State’s expected cannabis sales revenue and put his own bit of reefer madness on the report of  legal weed success.

The post, in which Scaramucci claims that the “overuse” of legal weed is “creating a zombie apocalypse,” was unearthed by cannabis activist Amanda Reiman, has yet to come to fruition, with no such reports of brain eating or mindless, arm-extended wandering.

Someone should tell Anthony that Washington D.C. also has legal weed and make sure he’s been taking cover from the mindless, stoned masses since moving to the nation’s capitol.

It is not exactly clear what made Scaramucci a viable candidate for the highly visible White House position, other than his relationship with Trump, of course, but we’re gonna guess that “the Mooch” won’t be the last talking head to take the podium and speak for Donald.

By JOE REEDY, Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida legislators are back on a path to passing a bill for enacting the state’s constitutional amendment expanding the use of medical marijuana.

Gov. Rick Scott added medical marijuana to the agenda for the special legislative session that began Wednesday after lawmakers reached a compromise on key elements. The House’s Health & Human Services Committee passed it on Wednesday night. The Senate’s Health Policy Committee will meet Thursday morning, with both chambers likely to review it later in the day.

“Both sides made significant concessions and were able to come together,” said Rep. Ray Rodrigues, who sponsored the House’s bill. “Neither one of us got everything we wanted, but we both got something we could live with.”

The amendment, approved by 71 percent of voters in November, expands legal use beyond the limited prescriptions for low-strength marijuana allowed under a 2014 law. It also expands the eligible ailments beyond the current list of cancer, epilepsy and chronic muscle spasms to include HIV and AIDS, glaucoma, post-traumatic stress disorder, ALS, Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and similar conditions.

When the bill implementing the amendment fell apart late in the session, the Senate wanted to limit each treatment center to 15 locations with no sunset provisions and make medical marijuana subject to sales tax. The House wanted no caps and no sales tax.

Under the agreement, there will be a limit of 25 retail dispensaries per medical marijuana treatment center, which can increase by five for every 100,000 patients added to the registry. The cap would expire on April 1, 2020. The legislation also adds 10 more medical marijuana treatment centers, meaning there would be 17 statewide by October. Four additional centers would be added for every 100,000 patients.

According to the Department of Health, the state registry now has 16,614 patients. A recent state revenue impact study projects that by 2022 there will be 472,000 medical cannabis patients and $542 million in sales.

Sen. Rob Bradley, the Senate’s main sponsor of the bill, said marijuana would not be taxed because it is considered to be medicine.

Patients and caregivers say the proposed rules remain too restrictive. The bill allows patients to receive an order for three 70-day supplies during a doctor’s visit that they could then take to a medical marijuana treatment center, but it bans smoking. The smoking ban is likely to be challenged in the courts. Training for doctors would drop from eight hours to two but they would still have to stringently document patients’ conditions before prescribing marijuana.

“There’s that saying about having something done is better than perfect. People are counting on something getting done,” said John Morgan, who played a key role in getting the amendment on the ballot and passed.

Morgan has said he will sue the state for not allowing smoking, but Rodrigues said there aren’t any scientific studies to show that smoking is effective.

“If he wants to sue us, that it is his prerogative. I am confident it can be defended in front of a judge,” Rodrigues said.

For the past month, medical marijuana supporters have said it would be easier for the Legislature to establish the framework of rules instead of the Department of Health, which went through several rounds of litigation when trying to determine who would be licensed to produce and distribute pot.

The amendment requires new laws to be in place by July 3 and enacted by October. Rodrigues said he is optimistic the bill will pass, despite an ongoing feud over the state budget.

“If they were going to have an impact, I believe we would not have to an agreement in the first place,” Rodrigues said.

___

Follow Joe Reedy on Twitter at www.twitter.com/joereedy . Read more of his work at https://apnews.com/search/joe%20reedy .

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Jeff Sessions on the Brink

Posted by | July 23, 2017 | Cannabis News

Cannabisjobs.us

Jeff Sessions on the Brink

This is WeedWeek, because cannabis news matters.
Like WeedWeek on Facebookfollow it on Instagram and Twitter and share it with the link weedweek.net. Subscribers’ names and contact info are confidential. You can also follow me on Twitter.
List your conferences, festivals and parties for free on the site.
Would you appreciate a WeedWeek regional supplement with more news from California and/or Canada? Or more news about the opioid crisis? Sign up at the appropriate link.
Want to advertise in WeedWeek? Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com.
Note to readers: WeedWeek is now on Patreon.
 
The newsletter will remain free, but small contributions will enable readers to participate in WeedWeek’s mission to offer credible, well-informed cannabis journalism. 

 
Starting at $2 a month, we’re offering some fun perks and swag.
 
At $25 a month you can join me on a monthly Google Hangout to talk all things green rush.
Starting at $50 a month you can promote yourself and your organization’s brand in the newsletter every week.
 
Check it out. Thanks!
 
Here’s the news:
Politics

Representatives from the Justice Department, Vice President Mike Pence’s office and the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy traveled to Colorado for closed-door meetings on marijuana policy.

Members of the delegation met with with Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers (R) and the city’s chief of police. They also met with Gov. John Hickenlooper’s (D) staff, state regulators and the U.S. Attorney’s office.

“Probably most of the discussion centered around the huge black market that exists for marijuana in Colorado,” legalization opponent Suthers said.

Months ago, Attorney General Jeff Sessions requested recommendations by July 27 (Thursday) on marijuana enforcement from his Justice Department task force. Sessions adamantly opposes legalization, but it’s not clear how he plans to put his beliefs into practice.

Justice official Michael Murray who’s leading the marijuana assessment was with the delegation as was a State Department official with expertise in international treaty negotiations.

A legal aid to Hickenlooper said the only question he remembers Murray asking involved 2014 guidance, from the Treasury Department’s financial crimes unit.

“Immediate or future federal enforcement activities [were] not broached,” The Cannabist reports.

Meanwhile, the Washington Post learned Sessions discussed campaign related matters with the Russian ambassador during the 2016 campaign, appearing to contradict Sessions’ sworn testimony.

Trump ally Dana Rohrabacher, probably cannabis’s best Republican friend in Congress, is also “the most vociferous defender of Russian interests in Congress.” Rohrabacher, who I believe is the only member of Congress to say he has used MED, also asked a Nasa scientist about the possibility of ancient civilizations on Mars.

Trump said his Mexican border wall should be transparent to prevent people from being hit by flying sacks of drugs. The Daily Show did a segment.

Massachusetts lawmakers sent a REC implementation bill to Gov. Charlie Baker (R), who’s expected to sign. State treasurer Deborah Goldberg (D) has “no idea” if dispensaries will open as scheduled in July 2018. MJ Biz Daily has an FAQ.

Maine Gov. Paul LePage said he would veto any bill taxing REC but not MED.

New Hampshire decriminalized. The Concord Monitor has a good piece on how police are preparing. All six New England states have now decriminalized.

California may issue grow licenses early to avoid product shortages. San Francisco is setting up an Office of Cannabis.

Four Congressmen, two from each party, discussed cannabis reform on Facebook live.

Rep. Keith Ellison, (D- Minn.) wants Democrats to campaign on cannabis legalization.

Republican candidates for Colorado governor discussed marijuana policy.

D.C.’s non-voting Representative Eleanor Holmes Norton wants the capital to have a cannabis industry.

Some other Congresspeople made pot jokes.

Some of Canada’s provincial premiers — the equivalent of governors — want to see REC implementation delayed. REC is on sale in Uruguay pharmacies.

Lynwood became the first city in L.A. County to start negotiating with licensed cannabis businesses.

Oregon has a new director of legal cannabis enforcement.

In-store use could happen in Alaska.

It was a false report that said Malia Obama was fired from her internship at the U.S. Embassy in Spain for smoking pot.

                                                               Classified Ad

Staying updated on cannabis news is obviously important to you. For daily updates, subscribe to Marijuana Moment, a newsletter from longtime legalization activist and journalist Tom Angell.

Breaking news, primary source documents and exclusive scoops. http://MarijuanaMoment.net

                                                                          *

Business

A California bill would allow cannabis businesses to take state income tax deductions not permitted on federal taxes.

Bloomberg looks into the EPA’s refusal to license pesticides for cannabis.

New cannabis advertising restrictions take effect tomorrow in Washington.

The National Cannabis Industry Association sponsored an ice cream break at a American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) conference. The group writes conservative legislation to be adopted by state governments.

Massachusetts’ highest court ruled that a woman fired for MED use can sue her former employer, reversing an earlier decision.

Since REC legalization, Colorado has collected more than $500M in pot taxes.

A tobacco shop chain is the leading contributor to Michigan’s 2018 REC push.

I wrote about product distribution headaches in California for L.A. Weekly. The Onion is not concerned about pot shortages.

The CEO of Canadian producer Maricann says companies should focus on Western Europe.

A CNBC opinion piece explains what Jeff Sessions gets wrong about legalization.

The Santa Rosa Press-Democrat asks if wine and weed are friend or foe. Emerald Report finds both kinds of growers collaborating on a biodynamic pot farm.

                                                                       Advertisement

Health and Science

The Senate may still  vote on a replacement for Obamacare, that would cause millions to lose their health insurance. The 10 key votes come from Alaska, West Virginia, Maine, Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Louisiana and Arkansas. All of those states have legalized MED or REC. Some have thriving industries.

To learn what you can do, go to Indivisible’s TrumpCare Ten page.

*

In D.C., veterans groups are becoming increasingly vocal in their calls for access to MED, the L.A. Times reports. The opioid epidemic is boosting their case.

A California couple is speaking out about the dangers of using butane to make concentrates.

From the Cannifornian:

[Alex] Gonzales, 25, and his girlfriend Selina Cervantes, 21, said Tuesday that they are trying to put their lives back together after the accident. Gonzales suffered major burns to much of his body, and had skin grafts over much of his right side. Cervantes was even more badly injured: She is completely covered in burns, her lips and many of her fingers were burned off and she now must use a wheelchair.

A study found frequent use of butane-extracted concentrates is associated with higher levels of dependence, academic and occupational problems and poor self-care.

In California, the future of cannabis depends on rain, Hayley Fox reports.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse wants to build an app to measure marijuana impairment. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is also interested in a breathalyzer and a reliable standard for measuring impairment.

Forty five percent of Americans have tried cannabis and 12% use regularly, according to a Gallup poll.

A study found cannabis has a “bidirectional effect” on sexual function. (A little can help, too much can hurt.)

A Forbes contributor learns about the cannabis course offerings available at the University of Vermont.

Chats on Reddit offer an upclose look at the opioid epidemic. A Florida 10 year old died with heroin and fentanyl in his system.

A majority of Americans support medical research into psychedelics, according to a YouGov poll.


Criminal Justice

AG Jeff Sessions reinstated the use of civil asset forfeiture a law enforcement practice enabling authorities to seize cars and other property when there’s probable cause of a crime. Often used in drug cases, the Obama administration curtailed the practice due to abuse. Sessions is reinstating the federal practice even in states where it’s banned. Trump also supports the practice.

Conservative National Review called the program a “national disgrace.” Criticism came from all sides.

Defending it, deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein suggested it would help end the opioid crisis.

The Washington Post’s Christopher Ingraham offers a history of DARE, the anti-drug program endorsed by Sessions.

Ingraham writes:

Sessions may believe that the program saved lives, but decades of evidence-based research, including some conducted by the Justice Department he now heads, has shown the program to be ineffective — and it might even make the drug problem worse.

Ngozi Ndulue, the NAACP’s senior director of criminal justice, published a tough anti-Sessions op-ed in the San Francisco Chronicle.

A New York Times editorial called for fair enforcement of marijuana laws across races.

American and European authorities shut down AlphaBay and Hansa Market, two of the largest dark net markets, online drug bazaar successors to Silk Road. AlphaBay had 40,000 vendors, and 200,000 users, the Justice Department said.

Investigators are looking into how $1M worth of weed was found in several brand-new, Mexican-made Ford Fusions at an Ohio car dealership in Ohio. “American Voices” weigh in at The Onion.

A Colorado ruled police searches require more evidence than a dog trained to smell pot.

An Oregon farmed told detailed an April five-hour ordeal when he was robbed, beaten and tortured by seven suspects in ninja turtle masks. A man who discussed investing in the farm has pleaded guilty, but is not believed to have been one of the assailants.

At least four were shot, one fatally, during a dispensary robbery in south L.A.

Denver police did a sting operation on the International Church of Cannabis.

*

Product reviews:

*

Culture

Drug Policy Alliance named Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno as its new executive director. She previously spent 13 years at Human Rights Watch. The group also released a glossary on how to talk about drugs.

NORML wants AAA to stop opposing legalization.

On a visit to Colorado, Berkshire Eagle investigations editor Larry Parnass learns that with REC Massachusetts can expect lots of visitors.

D.C. activists are planning a pot burning ceremony in a D.C. basilica during next month’s total eclipse.

Leafly explains what ‘Larf’ cannabis is.

It’s not too late for High Times’ guide on where to sneak a puff at major league ballparks.

Emerald Report found a Lord of the Rings-esque, cannabis-friendly, “magical tree house“ in Washington. It can be booked through AirBnB.

Here’s the WeedWeek list of pot journalists on Twitter and the list of cannabusiness people on Twitter. Both are works in progress. Recommendations welcome.

I’ve also created two political Twitter lists you can subscribe to: Real News and Tweeting the Resistance.

Want to reach a devoted audience of top cannabis professionals? Advertise in WeedWeek. Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com for details.

Is WeedWeek worth $2 a month to you? Contribute on Patreon.
Bye,
Alex

Advertising policy: Advertisers and contributors through Patreon have no influence on WeedWeek’s editorial content or on the content of articles that I write for other publications. In an effort to replicate the separation of business and editorial operations practiced at reputable news organizations, a WeedWeek salesperson will be responsible for all sales-related contact with advertisers and will work, as much as possible, without input from me. Any future advertising queries sent to me will be referred to a salesperson. In the newsletter, all ads and other forms of paid content will be clearly marked. I will not approach potential advertisers to solicit business, and reserve the right to reject ads if they present a conflict of interest, the appearance of a conflict of interest or for any other reason.

alexhalperin.com

All rights reserved.

Cannabisjobs.us

WeedWeek, July 15, 2017: Growing Pains in Nevada

This is WeedWeek, because cannabis news matters.
This is WeedWeek’s second anniverary edition, arriving in 9,975 inboxes. Thanks so much for your support and encouragement. ( Now buy some ads.)
Like WeedWeek on Facebookfollow it on Instagram and Twitter and share it with the link weedweek.net. Subscribers’ names and contact info are confidential. You can also follow me on Twitter.
List your conferences, festivals and parties for free on the site.
Would you appreciate a WeedWeek regional supplement with more news from California and/or Canada? Or more news about the opioid crisis? Sign up at the appropriate link.
Want to advertise in WeedWeek? Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com.
Note to readers: WeedWeek is now on Patreon.
 
The newsletter will remain free, but small contributions will enable readers to participate in WeedWeek’s mission to offer credible, well-informed cannabis journalism. 

 
Starting at $2 a month, we’re offering some fun perks and swag.
 
At $25 a month you can join me on a monthly Google Hangout to talk all things green rush.
Starting at $50 a month you can promote yourself and your organization’s brand in the newsletter every week.
 
Check it out. Thanks!
 
Here’s the news:
Politics

Nevada regulators approved emergency measures to keep the REC flowing. Dispensaries struggled to keep product on shelves amid lines out the door and a state requirement that only alcohol distributors can distribute cannabis. Despite news reports, Nevada did not declare a state of emergency.  For more see here.

On a visit to Las Vegas, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions didn’t mention marijuana. Speaking to the anti-drug group DARE, Sessions defended his efforts to reinstate tough drug sentences:

Now, some people today say that the solution to the problem of drug abuse is to be more accepting of the problem of drug abuse. They say marijuana use can prevent addiction. They say the answer is only treatment. They say don’t talk about enforcement. To me, that just doesn’t make any sense. In fact, I would argue that one reason that we are in such a crisis right now is that we have subscribed to this mistaken idea that drug abuse is no big deal.

He devoted most of the speech to opioids. Vox explains why Jeff Sessions loves DARE.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker (R) said the state is  close to a compromise REC law. If a deal can’t be reached, he said “at some point we’re going to have to go forward with the law as it was written.”

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh (D) who opposed Massachusetts’ REC vote, says he expects the city to allow cannabis businesses. He’s been critical of cities that voted for REC but have banned the industry. Walsh, a problem drinker in the past, still has concerns.

Proposed legislation would legalize MED and REC in Wisconsin.

There’s an effort to legalize REC in New York through a state constitutional convention. The campaign is known as Restrict and Regulate New York (RRNY).

Hawaii will officially call it cannabis, rather than marijuana.
A new study in the journal Addiction examines what the “patchwork” of state cannabis rules means for regulation. For more, see this video.

Activists say Florida’s ban on smokable MED could lead the state to pass REC.U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Purdue (R), a former governor of Georgia, opposes REC calling it a “

slippery slope.”  He supports efforts to grow hemp with “very tight restrictions.”

Congressman Doug LaMalfa (R-Calif.) is calling for a crackdown on pot growing on federal land.
Congressman Andy Harris (R-Maryland), a medical doctor, supports MED research. He’s best known for blocking cannabis regulation in D.C., which legalized REC in 2014.

Anti-legalization activist Kevin Sabet opposes the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer amendment, which would continue blocking the Justice Department from enforcement actions against state legal MED.
The Anchorage Assembly is pushing to allow consumption in dispensaries. Here are the cannabis laws

Oregon passed this year.

So far, no one has applied for an Arkansas MED license.
The U.K. has no intention of legalizing. However, MED may be legalized in the Channel Islands.

Business

Weedmaps was criticized for insensitivity, for a South Boston billboard saying “States that legalized marijuana had 25% fewer opioid-related deaths.”

Strong results from MED producer Aphria suggest falling MED production costs in Canada.

Monthly sales exceeding $100M is the “new normal” in Colorado. An error in state law is excluding Denver’s transit system and several arts and cultural organizations from their share of pot taxes.

Maine is trying to figure out how high it can raise pot taxes without sending buyers to the illegal market.

A Pennsylvania journalist asks if REC would fix the state’s budget woes.

In fully legal Uruguay, “The government is your pot dealer.

NPR reports on the wine and cannabis industries adjusting to each other in Northern California.

A house panel discussed, but did not vote on, a banking access amendment for cannabis businesses.

                                                                       Advertisement

Health and Science

The Senate may still  vote on a replacement for Obamacare, that would cause millions to lose their health insurance. The 10 key votes come from Alaska, West Virginia, Maine, Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Louisiana and Arkansas. All of those states have legalized MED or REC. Some have thriving industries.

To learn what you can do, go to Indivisible’s TrumpCare Ten page.

A Montana man charged with vehicular homicide for killing a motorcyclist is challenging the state’s cannabis DUI law. Montana considers the legal limit to be 5 nanograms of THC per milliliter. The man charges that there’s no science to support that level equalling impairment. At the time of the accident his level was 19 ng/ML.

Dr. Lloyd Sederer, chief medical officer of New York state’s mental health office, says Canada is getting legalization right.

A judge ruled that a former sales manager with Insys Therapeutics cannot access MED while awaiting trial. He’s accused of arranging arranging kickbacks for doctors who prescribed Insys’ spray form of the powerful opioid fentanyl.

The Senate Appropriations Committee voted 24 to 7 to allow VA doctors to prescribe MED where legal. Veterans group American Legion supports a bill to reschedule cannabis as Schedule III, which would make it easier to study and for veterans to access.

Doctors are rethinking whether babies born addicted to opioids should be taken from their mothers.

A transient faces charges in Colorado after he showed up at an ER with more than a pound of pot.


 Advertisement

Criminal Justice

Two men are charged with homicide following the killing and burning of four men who sought to buy pot in wealthy Bucks County, Pa.

The House Judiciary Committee advanced a bill that would empower U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions to schedule and set criminal penalties for new drugs. The legislation faces opposition from conservative groups and criminal justice reform groups. The Drug Policy Alliance notes that in late 2015 the same committee approved a bill to reduce sentences for drug crimes.

A new report commissioned by Drug Policy Alliance found New York City marijuana possession arrests continue to be “marked by extremely high racial disparities.

An L.A. study found dispensaries to reduce crime in their vicinities. See the study here.

The Toronto Star called on Canada to decriminalize and make pardons easier to obtain ahead of REC legalization next year.

Contrary to press reports, Oregon did not decriminalize all drugs, but lawmakers did vote to reduce criminal penalties for drugs.

The DEA will award patches to girl and boy scouts who take a drug free pledge and participate in anti-drug activities.

Leafly explains your rights if you’re pulled over with weed in the car.

*

Product reviews:

*

Culture

Pot won’t be an official part of California county fairs anytime soon.

I came across a 1981 N.Y. Times article about New Zealand-leading a pot crackdown in Antarctica.

There’s a sober rave trend in the U.K.

Willamette Week tries Leira cannabis cigars which bill themselves as “420 for the 1%.” A cigarillo sized joint sells for $110.

Flore, in the Castro District, has San Francisco’s first cannabis cocktail menu. The San Francisco Chronicle names the country’s top 10 cannabis chefs.

In Malana, an Indian village known for its hash, a Hindu deity has forbidden boarding houses from renting to backpackers.

Here’s the WeedWeek list of pot journalists on Twitter and the list of cannabusiness people on Twitter. Both are works in progress. Recommendations welcome.

I’ve also created two political Twitter lists you can subscribe to: Real News and Tweeting the Resistance.

Want to reach a devoted audience of top cannabis professionals? Advertise in WeedWeek. Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com for details.

Is WeedWeek worth $2 a month to you? Contribute on Patreon.
Bye,
Alex

Advertising policy: Advertisers and contributors through Patreon have no influence on WeedWeek’s editorial content or on the content of articles that I write for other publications. In an effort to replicate the separation of business and editorial operations practiced at reputable news organizations, a WeedWeek salesperson will be responsible for all sales-related contact with advertisers and will work, as much as possible, without input from me. Any future advertising queries sent to me will be referred to a salesperson. In the newsletter, all ads and other forms of paid content will be clearly marked. I will not approach potential advertisers to solicit business, and reserve the right to reject ads if they present a conflict of interest, the appearance of a conflict of interest or for any other reason.

alexhalperin.com

All rights reserved.

 

Cannabisjobs.us
This is WeedWeek, because cannabis news matters.
Like  it on Facebookfollow it on Instagram and Twitter and share it with the link weedweek.net. Subscribers’ names and contact info are confidential. You can also follow me on Twitter.
List your conferences, festivals and parties for free on the site.
Would you appreciate a WeedWeek regional supplement with more news from California and/or Canada? Or more news about the opioid crisis? Sign up at the appropriate link.
Want to advertise in WeedWeek? Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com.
Note to readers: WeedWeek is now on Patreon.
 
The newsletter will remain free, but small contributions will enable readers to participate in WeedWeek’s mission to offer credible, well-informed cannabis journalism. 

 
Starting at $2 a month, we’re offering some fun perks and swag.
 
At $25 a month you can join me on a monthly Google Hangout to talk all things green rush.
Starting at $50 a month you can promote yourself and your organization’s brand in the newsletter every week.
 
Check it out. Thanks!
 
Here’s the news:
Politics
Denver has released its first in the nation rules for existing businesses to apply for social use permits. The requirements dropped requirements for a ventilation system and for customers entering a social use area to sign a waiver. Meanwhile, Amsterdam’s coffeehouses are on the decline.
East Bay Express has a useful piece on Medicinal and Adult Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA) which consolidates California’s MED and REC regulations. Gov. Jerry Brown (D) signed it into law this week.
The S.F. Chronicle has a package on the state of the industry in the Bay Area.
In L.A. Weekly I reported that the city’s industry is worried about the regulations proposed by City Council. Their concerns include that it would extend the city’s limited immunity policy rather than offer full licenses.
Mark Ridley-Thomas, chairman of the L.A. County Board of Supervisors, is “still skeptical,” about legal weed in L.A.
California growers are worried about pesticide rules.
D.C. lawmakers are pushing to give minorities priority for cannabis business licenses. Angelenos are rallying for a diverse industry as well.
In the context of ending health care discrimination, the United Nations and World Health Organization called for the decriminalization of drugs, sex work and consensual sexual activity.
The Cannabist looks into the hemp industry’s high-stakes lawsuit against the DEA.
Philly legalization activist and journalist Chris Goldstein says Pennsylvania’s “no-smoke” law means MED will be unaffordable. John Morgan, a wealthy Florida personal injury lawyer and cannabis activist, is suing the state to allow smokable MED.
The N.Y. Times has an interesting piece on California’s sparsely populated, heavily Republican northeast,which feels underrepresented in Sacramento. The story misses an opportunity to discuss prevalent views on cannabis.
There’s a fight in South Australia over whether MED patients should be allowed to drive.

Greece legalized MED.

I recommend “Trump’s Voter Suppression Efforts Have Begun,” an important N.Y. Times Op-Ed by Dale Ho, director of the ACLU’s Voter Suppression Project.

Business

The L.A. Times has a fascinating and informative piece about the state of cannabis banking in California. It includes an interview with an anonymous credit union executive detailing the terms offered to cannabis companies and recounts a mutilation worthy of Quentin Tarantino. Go here for a harrowing L.A. Times account of the referenced 2012 kidnapping and torture case.

Over the Counter Markets notified social media app MassRoots of activity promoting its stock. MassRoots denied any knowledge of the activity. Paying to promote one’s own stock must be reported.

REC sales in Nevada are off to a roaring start. For more see here.

One hundred and eighty five businesses applied for Ohio’s 24 grow licenses. New Cannabis Ventures finds that applicants include several multi-state companies. The site also notes that cannabis oil sales are way up in Canada.

I wrote up notable June deals for Blunt Network.

Some Alaska dispensaries saw their Facebook pages shut down.

Colorado’s solid economy has some employers abandoning drug tests.

Colorado awarded its first transporter licenses.

Case Western Reserve Law Professor Craig Nard looks into the upcoming fights over pot patents.

Newsweek on cannabis jobs. A New Jersey man with Marfan syndrome is suing the glass manufacturerwhich fired him for MED use.

Canna Law Blog examines the issues surrounding cannabusiness reverse mergers.

L.A. Weekly profiles Jessica Assaf, CEO of focus group and networking company Cannabis Feminist. The paper also previews the upcoming female empowerment summit in L.A.

A Czech entrepreneur who lost three fingers in a printing press accident has a popular line of CBD topicals in the U.K.

Wal-Mart is selling a $299 machine for making cannabis concentrates at home. The decision was apparently motivated by Amazon selling the same thing.

The U.N. says Morocco is the world’s largest hash exporter.

                                                                       Advertisement

Health and Science

Scientists have mapped CB1, the human receptor that binds with cannabis, Wired reports:

“For a long time, scientists thought CB1 receptors worked like lock and key with THC and its                       chemical cousins—one size fits one. However, new research shows that CB1 receptors are                       actually quite malleable, stretching to fit a wider range of molecules. That could be useful                           knowledge as researchers try to synthesize chemicals that mimic the desirable effects of cannabis           (such as pain relief) without the side effects (such as anxiety, weight gain, addiction, or federal                   prosecution).”

Scientists called out the web site Salon.com for publishing a misleading article on cannabis. The article, which originally appeared at the cannabis site The Fresh Toast, claimed a study by Oregon Health and Science University researchers found cannabis users to have lower body mass index (BMI) than non-users.

The researchers were actually studying the relationship between cannabis use and bone mineral density and said the BMI data was taken out of context in the headline “Science: Regular consumption of marijuana keeps you thin fit and active.” The researchers found no correlation between cannabis use and bone mineral density. (Disclosure: I used to work for Salon.)

Almost a year after the DEA said it would make MED research easier, a facility at the University of Mississippi remains the only federally permitted grow.

Some psychiatrists consider pot a psychoactive.

The number of U.S. opioid prescriptions declined slightly between 2012 and 2015, a “glimmer of hope” in efforts against the crisis.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) is under pressure from veterans groups to add PTSD as a qualifying condition for MED.

Canadian MED producer Canopy Growth is funding a MED research program at the Canadian AIDS society.

An anti-drug and gang group in Carlsbad, New Mexico objects to dispensaries using the word “pharmaceutical” in their name.


 Advertisement

Criminal Justice

Politico finds Palm Beach, Florida, near President Trump’s Mar-A-Lago estate, to be a center of predatory “sober homes.” These unregulated businesses present themselves as recovery centers to people who use opioids from around the country. In fact, they allow rampant heroin use and “body broker” the patients to nearby outpatient centers.

Jawara McIntosh, a musician, cannabis activist, and son of Reggae icon Peter Tosh, is in a coma after being beaten in jail by a fellow inmate. McIntosh is serving a one year sentence in New Jersey for marijuana possession. Rolling Stone has the inside story.

Violence among Mexican drug gangs is escalating in the power vacuum left by kingpin El Chapo, who is in U.S. custody awaiting trial.

*

WeedWeek is hiring! WeedWeek is seeking an experienced sales and marketing executive to lead its business. WeedWeek can become a leading cannabis media company, your role will be to get us there, beginning with ad sales. Experience building media brands a plus. Cannabis experience unnecessary. 
This job will pay in a generous commission and equity package. No salary. No benefits. Location unimportant. Hours flexible but the ideal candidate will consider it a full time job or close to it. The successful candidate will be able to work with minimal supervision.
Interested candidates should send their CV and a cover letter explaining how they will turn WeedWeek into a thriving business, without compromising its journalistic standards. weedweeknews@gmail.com.
Product reviews:

*

Culture

The streets of Boston smell like marijuana. Same in Washington D.C., where the smell is, “Everywhere, all the time.” In the D.C. story, academic librarian Stephen Sears uses a great phrase for the lingering odors in the street: “Ghost weed.”

Northern Nevada Business Weekly dives into the “cannabis” vs. “marijuana” debate.

Restaurants are thrilled at the end of Utah’s “Zion Curtain” law. Some bars will now be able to tear down the frosted glass blocking drinkers’ view of the bartender and bottles on the wall. The law was designed to avoid making alcohol glamorous to kids.

I told the stories behind six L.A. strains.

Twelve racing greyhounds in Florida have tested positive for cocaine in what’s being called the “biggest greyhound drug case in American history.”

A couple got married at a Nevada grow house.

Here’s the WeedWeek list of pot journalists on Twitter and the list of cannabusiness people on Twitter. Both are works in progress. Recommendations welcome.

I’ve also created two political Twitter lists you can subscribe to: Real News and Tweeting the Resistance.

Want to reach a devoted audience of top cannabis professionals? Advertise in WeedWeek. Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com for details.

Is WeedWeek worth $2 a month to you? Contribute on Patreon.
Bye,
Alex

Advertising policy: Advertisers and contributors through Patreon have no influence on WeedWeek’s editorial content or on the content of articles that I write for other publications. In an effort to replicate the separation of business and editorial operations practiced at reputable news organizations, a WeedWeek salesperson will be responsible for all sales-related contact with advertisers and will work, as much as possible, without input from me. Any future advertising queries sent to me will be referred to a salesperson. In the newsletter, all ads and other forms of paid content will be clearly marked. I will not approach potential advertisers to solicit business, and reserve the right to reject ads if they present a conflict of interest, the appearance of a conflict of interest or for any other reason.

alexhalperin.com

All rights reserved.

Cannabisjobs.us
This is WeedWeek, because cannabis news matters.
Like  it on Facebookfollow it on Instagram and Twitter and share it with the link weedweek.net. Subscribers’ names and contact info are confidential. You can also follow me on Twitter.
List your conferences, festivals and parties for free on the site.
Would you appreciate a WeedWeek regional supplement with more news from California and/or Canada? Or more news about the opioid crisis? Sign up at the appropriate link.
Want to advertise in WeedWeek? Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com.
Note to readers: WeedWeek is now on Patreon.
 
The newsletter will remain free, but small contributions will enable readers to participate in WeedWeek’s mission to offer credible, well-informed cannabis journalism. 

 
Starting at just $2 a month, we’re offering some fun perks and swag.
 
At $25 a month you can join me on a monthly Google Hangout to talk all things green rush.
Starting at $50 a month you can promote yourself and your organization’s brand in the newsletter every week.
 
Check it out. Thanks!
 
Here’s the news:
Politics

In Nevada fashion, REC went on sale at 12:01 a.m. last night. Restocking may be a concern for dispensaries due to an ongoing legal battle: Liquor dealers have exclusive distribution rights, a judge ruled, but none of the five companies that applied for a distribution license is ready.

 

The Vegas market is expected to be lucrative and acclimate tourists to legal weed. Cannabis is at as far a remove from the gaming industry as is possible in Vegas

 

The AP answers your FAQ. The knick-knack makers were ready.

Massachusetts is still struggling to develop REC rules.

 

California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) signed the state’s $125 billion budget which includes the cannabis regulations known as the trailer bill.

 

New regulations in Washington appear designed to protect the state’s industry from U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

 

Oregon is among the more restrictive states on cannabis data sharing. Ohio wouldn’t reveal the list of MED license applicants to the Cincinnati Enquirer.

 

Rhode Island lawmakers have given up on REC for now and instead want a 19-member commission to study the issue. Maine passed an emergency law to keep growers more than 500-feet from schools.

 

The conservative National Review says legalization will lead to more marijuana consumption.

 

California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) and gubernatorial candidate held a $500 a plate fundraiser for the cannabis industry.

 

Anti-legalization New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) dismissed state REC hearings as a “dog and pony show.”

 

There was a complicated spat over whether pro-legalization Congressmen Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.) and Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) were dealt a defeat with the omission of language protecting state legal MED from the current version of a federal spending bill. Whether the language will ultimately be included is not yet clear.

 

Read pro-legalization activist Tom Angell’s take here, and anti-legalization activist Kevin Sabet’s take here. Angell calls the anti-legalization side “increasingly desperate.” Sabet says the Congressmen are “funded by illegal marijuana operations selling pot candies to kids.” Sabet adds that REC setbacks in Vermont and Rhode Island suggest the industry is losing momentum.

 

Rep. Blumenauer tweeted, “SAM’s [Sabet’s group] complete misrepresentation of the legislative process is entirely consistent with their repeated falsehoods about marijuana.”

 

Unprompted, U.S. Secretary of Energy Rick Perry defended states’ rights on cannabis.

 

A bill in California would ban cannabis businesses from advertising on branded swag.

 

The LDS (Mormon) Church opposes Utah’s 2018 MED initiative.

 

Catalonia, Spain, the region which includes Barcelona, legalized REC.

Business

Maryland regulators moved to revoke a license awarded to an affiliate of Minnesota MED producer Vireo because two former Vireo employees face charges for allegedly driving 12 pounds of cannabis oil, worth about $500,000, in an armored vehicle from Minnesota to New York to meet a production deadline. Prosecutors said there were also fraudulent records in Minnesota indicating the oil had been destroyed.

 

A Vireo affiliate has been awarded a license in Pennsylvania. The company said it would appeal in Maryland.

 

A rural Oregon couple filed a racketeering (RICO) lawsuit against 43 cannabis-involved defendants. Canna Law Blog explains why RICO suits, originally intended to fight organized crime, pose an existential threat to the industry. “By its very design, RICO is intended to be ruinous to organizations caught in its crosshairs.”

 

A federal appeals court decision gives new hope to Fourth Corner Credit Union, a Denver group seeking to provide banking to cannabis companies. The 10th circuit court’s decision would allow Fourth Corner to reapply for the “master account” it needs to operate, from the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

 

Patient data was stolen in cyberattack on delivery app Eaze. TechCrunch reports that the perpetrator is ransoming the data for $70M.

 

Congress may be warming to a cannabis banking law.

 

The newly announced National Association of Cannabis Businesses wants the industry to self-regulateon issues like advertising, packaging, labeling and accounting practices.

 

With REC legalization 12 months away, Canada is facing a weed shortage. In the side video, Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau says they country hasn’t focussed on making money from legalization.

 

Buzzfeed examines prospects for pot cafes in Denver and nationwide and advises: “Adjust your expectations.” Denver released final rules for social use and plans to start accepting applications this summer.

 

A survey conducted by Eaze (the app), found that more women, and moms, are using cannabis.  See the study on modern cannabis consumers here.

 

I wrote about cannabis big-data firm Headset for L.A. Weekly.

 

Financial analyst Alan Brochstein looks at the best online brokers for trading cannabis stocks.

 

About 200,000 Americans work full or part time in cannabis, more than dental hygienists, slightly less than telemarketers.

 

The Wall Street Journals finds that working in “edgy” industries like cannabis and sex toys can hurt executives who later want jobs at mainstream companies. Cannabis experience “is not something that would be in our (management) assortment anytime soon,” Target CEO Brian Cornell said.

 

In another setback for MED in Hawaii, an insurer said it would stop providing legally required worker’s comp. insurance to seven of the state’s eight dispensaries. The insurer said the decision reflected potential exposure to criminal liability, not a value judgement about MED.

OSHA’s California division decided existing workplace protections adequately cover cannabis.

 

A few pharmaceutical companies are developing cannabis-based painkillers that they hope could replace opioids.

 

Canadian MED producer Tilray is packaging product to look like generic pharmaceuticals.

 

The Montana Department of Agriculture refuted a federal decision to deny water to a Montana hemp farmer. The department said the farmer is in full compliance with state and federal law.

 

Hemp crops are doing well in North Dakota, despite a drought.

 

Weedon, a town in Quebec, wants to join the green rush.

                                                                       Advertisement

Health and Science

EPA chief Scott Pruitt (R) rejected California’s request to approve four pesticides for use on cannabis. All four pesticides are already approved for use on other crops.

 

Efforts to sway Congress on national CBD legalization are underway, The Cannabist finds. The story is part of a special report called “CBD, TBD.”

 

In preparation for legalization, Canada released “Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines.” Canadian cannabis activist Dana Larsen says the recommendations are “biased against cannabis,” compared to the government’s recommendations for alcohol.  WeedWeek isn’t aware of any legal state that has issued an equivalent document.

 

A study found that cannabinoids may prevent migraine, but have more limited benefits for cluster headache.

 

A survey by HelloMD, in collaboration with UC Berkeley, of almost 3,000 people in HelloMD’s patient database suggests a strong willingness to replace opioids with cannabis. (HelloMD has advertised in WeedWeek.) For the results see here.

 

FiveThirtyEight says data shortcomings may be exacerbating the opioids crisis.

 

A new study says the terms “hard drugs” and “soft drugs” are unhelpful.

 


 Advertisement

Criminal Justice

A Denver grand jury has indicted 74 following an investigation into a Colorado organization accused of shipping cannabis out of state, while bilking its investors. The organization, which had a base at a suburban Denver hydroponics store, is accused of shipping 100 pounds monthly, worth an estimated $200,000.  Ripped off investors include two former NFL players, neither of whom has been charged with a crime. The indictments represent the largest pot prosecution in Colorado since REC legalization. Most of the suspects remain at large. For more see here.

 

The law enforcement action was called Operation Toker Poker. A cannabis accessory brand called Toker Poker, is annoyed and considering legal action.

 

Workers contracted by the TSA at San Francisco and Oakland airport pleaded guilty to taking bribes in exchange for overlooking bundles of cocaine and marijuana sent through the security checkpoint.

 

Mark Holden, a leader of the Koch Brothers’ conservative political network criticized AG Jeff Sessions for trying to bring back the “harsh” sentences of the war on drugs. “You are never going to win the war on drugs. Drugs won.” The libertarian Koch Brothers have long favored criminal justice reform.

 

Sally Yates, who Trump fired as acting U.S. Attorney General in January, also rejects the Sessions approach.

 

Dan Rush, a former chair of Berkeley’s Medical Cannabis Commission pleaded guilty to three feloniesincluding money laundering after using the position to enrich himself. An attorney who Rush worked with pleaded guilty in February.

 

Armed robbers took more than $30,000 from the CBCB, a Berkeley dispensary. The shop was closed and no injuries were reported.

 

President Trump nominated Dr. Jerome Adams, an anesthesiologist and needle-exchange advocate for U.S. Surgeon General. Adams is currently Indiana’s health commissioner where he served under Vice-President Mike Pence (R) when Pence was governor.

 

Middletown, Ohio is may require overdose victims to perform community service to pay for the overdose drug Narcan. If after two opioid overdoses, an individual hasn’t performed the service, a city councilman proposes not sending out EMTs the third time. Middletown saw 532 overdoses last year and spent $11,000 on Narcan. There have been 577 overdoses so far this year and the town has spent more than $30,000 on Narcan.

 

In the Philippines, police send corpses to hospitals to cover up for extrajudicial drug killings, according to family members of the deceased and other witnesses.

 

Denver police have a system for composting confiscated weed.

 

The feds have a pop-up court at this week’s Rainbow Family Gathering a festival on federal land in Oregon. The federal Bureau of Land Management promises to be out in force drug testing drivers on their way to and from Burning Man, which takes place on federal land in Nevada.

 

The new podcast called Ear Hustle is about life in California’s San Quentin prison.

Product reviews:

*

Culture

Rich, liberal Marin County, across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco, has a decades long history of hostility to commercial cannabis.

 

A reverend and a rabbi editorialized in favor of REC in Connecticut.

 

Cannabis cryptocurrency company PotCoin got lots of press for sponsoring Dennis Rodman’s recent trip to North Korea. (Editorial: Weird times.)

 

Not all chefs want to suppress the cannabis taste in edibles.

 

Singer John Mayer discussed replacing booze with weed. “Drinking is a fucking con,” he said.

 

Seattle’s 26-year old Hempfest is in financial trouble. A smaller version is planned for August.

 

NBC has pics from the Emerald Exchange, a cannabis farmers’ market in Malibu.

 

An Instagram of Kylie Jenner, topless, smoking a joint, accrued 3.2M+ likes.

 

Here’s the WeedWeek list of pot journalists on Twitter and the list of cannabusiness people on Twitter. Both are works in progress. Recommendations welcome.

I’ve also created two political Twitter lists you can subscribe to: Real News and Tweeting the Resistance.

Want to reach a devoted audience of top cannabis professionals? Advertise in WeedWeek. Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com for details.
Is WeedWeek worth $2 a month to you? Contribute on Patreon.
Bye,
Alex

Advertising policy: Advertisers and contributors through Patreon have no influence on WeedWeek’s editorial content or on the content of articles that I write for other publications. In an effort to replicate the separation of business and editorial operations practiced at reputable news organizations, a WeedWeek salesperson will be responsible for all sales-related contact with advertisers and will work, as much as possible, without input from me. Any future advertising queries sent to me will be referred to a salesperson. In the newsletter, all ads and other forms of paid content will be clearly marked. I will not approach potential advertisers to solicit business, and reserve the right to reject ads if they present a conflict of interest, the appearance of a conflict of interest or for any other reason.

alexhalperin.com

All rights reserved.

Cannabisjobs.us
Senators Push to Lock in State MED Rules
This is WeedWeek, because cannabis news matters.
Like  it on Facebookfollow it on Instagram and Twitter and share it with the link weedweek.net. Subscribers’ names and contact info are confidential. You can also follow me on Twitter.
List your conferences, festivals and parties for free on the site.
Would you appreciate a WeedWeek regional supplement with more news from California and/or Canada? Or more news about the opioid crisis? Sign up at the appropriate link.
Want to advertise in WeedWeek? Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com.
Note to readers: WeedWeek is now on Patreon, a way for your small monthly contributions to support WeedWeek and my reporting on the industry.
 
It works like NPR: The newsletter will remain free, but small contributions will enable readers to participate in our mission to offer credible, well-informed cannabis journalism. 

 
Starting at just $2 a month, we’re offering some fun perks and swag.
 
Starting at $50 a month you can promote yourself and your organization’s brand in the newsletter every week.
 
 
As with advertisers, Patreon contributors will have no influence on WeedWeek’s editorial content or on the pieces I write for other publications. 
Here’s the news:
Politics

Rolling Stone looks into the Senate’s bipartisan push to pass the CARERS Act, which would force the federal government to respect state MED laws. Sponsors include Democrats Cory Booker (N.J.), Al Franken (Minn.) and Kirsten Gillibrand (N.Y.) and Republicans Rand Paul (Ky.), Mike Lee (Utah) and Lisa Murkowski (Ak.). For more see here.

 

The 49-member Congressional Black Caucus declined to meet with President Trump, citing U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ efforts to “accelerate the failed war on drugs,” among other factors.

 

The Massachusetts Senate passed a bill to revise the voter-passed REC law. A journalist said cannabis activists should stop complaining and “chill out” over proposed changes, such as higher taxes. The state may also eliminate protections for people of color who want to join the industry.

 

After much back and forth, Vermont House Republicans blocked REC during a special legislative session. Gov. Phil Scott (R) said passing REC “wasn’t a priority for me.” The issue is likely to come up again in next year.

 

Nevada regulators want REC to be available July 1 despite a lawsuit from liquor wholesalers. The state’s powerful gaming industry has thus far declined to participate in the industry, but it wants to learn more.

 

Ohio Congressman Bob Gibbs (R) has repeatedly spoken up for MED but votes against it.

 

The Morning Call explains the MED situation in Pennsylvania. Philadelphia feels overlooked.

 

Dispensaries are confronting more grassroots opposition in San Francisco. Los Angeles is struggling to regulate its large market.

 

Canada is sticking to its goal to make REC available by July 2018.

 

Americans don’t mind if reporters use cannabis, according to a poll.

 

A Tampa strip club impresario and lung cancer patient is suing the state to grow his own MED.

 

Cuba says the movement toward legalization increases drug smuggling and said it would not liberalize its cannabis laws. The U.S. and Cuba are still collaborating to crack down on trafficking despite a chill in relations under President Trump.

 

In Poland, lawmakers voted to legalize MED. In Ireland, MED has run into political headwinds.

 

Seattle mayoral candidates discussed their favorite strains.

Business

MJ Freeway, a software firm for cannabis businesses, suffered its second security breach in six months, when some of its source code was posted online. MJ Freeway called it a “theft” but said its data would not be affected. In January its system suffered a minor crash which it called a criminal attack.

 

Despite these setbacks, MJ Freeway is on a good run. It recently won contracts to track inventory for the governments of Washington and Pennsylvania.

 

A new “self-regulatory” group called the National Association of Cannabis Businesses, wants to create national standards for the industry.

 

Citing fears of a Justice Department crackdown, PNC Bank said it will close pro-legalization group MPP’s 22 year old bank accounts.

 

The Guardian finds that commercial cultivation has a heavy environmental cost.

 

Louisiana State University will earn at least $3.4M over five years from a MED production deal.

 

Colorado’s cannabis producer tax has reached the historic low of 43 cents per gram.

 

Buzzfeed goes inside the race to develop a weed breathalyzer.

 

The Winklevoss twins are being sued after allegedly pledging to invest almost $500,000 in weed delivery app Eaze.

                                                                       Advertisement

Health and Science

Editorial: This week the U.S. Senate is expected to vote on a sweeping health care bill without public hearings. The best guess available is that it will leave 23 million more Americans uninsured. In exchange it will deliver large tax cuts to the wealthiest Americans. Vox found that eight Republicans who plan to vote for it can’t coherently defend it. 

 
The Senate vote comes down to 10 key states: Alaska, West Virginia, Maine, Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Louisiana and Arkansas. All of those states have legalized MED or REC. Some have thriving industries.
 
In December I argued in Slate that the cannabis industry’s unique history gives it a moral obligation to oppose the nomination of then Sen. Jeff Sessions (R) to U.S. Attorney General. No one listened. The industry’s largest lobby, the National Cannabis Industry Association, took an accommodationist stance. If there was any significant dissent within the industry, I’m unaware of it. 
 
The cannabis industry’s ties to the health care issue are perhaps not as direct as they were to Sessions, but if this bill passes, it will hurt many of you and the ones you love. It will also hurt your customers, employees, colleagues, patients and friends. 
 
Some cannabis people like to say they’re building a “new kind of industry,” one that cares about the world around it. In part that’s because many involved in cannabis have fought for justice themselves and know from experience that authority can be ignorant and cruel. But for too many, doing the right thing translates into making or eating gluten-free edibles, rather than active struggle to achieve what’s decent and right.    
 

An industry effort to oppose this health care law is another opportunity for cannabis to prove that it’s a new kind of industry. And if it misses enough opportunities, it will soon become a very familiar kind of industry. 

To learn what you can do, go to Indivisible’s TrumpCare Ten page.

To share this editorial on Facebook go here.

 

Two studies differed in their findings on whether legalization worsens road safety. One study found it did not change the number of fatalities, another study said it led to a three percent increase in crashes.

 

An Ohio coroner says he has seen cannabis mixed with the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl, but the statement couldn’t be confirmed independently.

 

Science journalist Maia Szalavitz says pot addiction is real.

 

California doctors are seeing more pot-induced vomiting.

 

States remain skeptical about including opioid addiction as a qualifying condition for MED.

 

A Kentucky lawmaker says terminally-ill patients should have MED access.

 

Researcher’s at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania will study MED’s effect on autistic children.

 

On the podcast “Shaping Fire” neurologist Dr. Ethan Russo talks about medical uses for MED and psilocybin (the hallucinogen in mushrooms).

Parents worry that in the Trump era it may be harder to obtain MED to curtail children’s seizures.

Advertisement

Criminal Justice

In a Washington Post op-ed, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions defended his plan to escalate the war on drugs. Among his points, Sessions argued that locking up more drug offenders will make minority neighborhoods safer.

 

The Post published rebuttals from cannabis activist and journalist Tom Angell, Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and others.

 

The Pew Charitable Trusts found no relation between a state’s drug incarceration rates and its drug problems.

 

New video looks at the shooting death of Philando Castile in Minnesota. The officer who fatally shot him after smelling pot was acquitted last week.

 

Queens New York man Carlos Cardona who pleaded guilty to a 1990 drug sale (his only conviction) and years later worked in hazardous conditions at Ground Zero faces deportation under Trump’s policies.

 

A UN report found that the global market in illegal drugs is on the rise, powered largely by cocaine and synthetics. There are about 250M illegal drug users worldwide including 183M cannabis users.

 

In Washington and Colorado, cases highlight the temptation for regulators to illegally assist cannabis businesses.

 

The Seattle Times reports on efforts to keep organized crime out of the legal industry.

 

A Colorado judge ruled that state laws don’t protect a man who caused an explosion while making hash at home.

 

In New Jersey, a group of clergy members want pot decriminalized and a notorious juvenile detention facility closed.

 

The Marshall Project says legalizing pot would reduce the number of searches during traffic stops.

 

ProPublica finds that the DEA is largely unaccountable “when its missions cost lives.

 

Drug-related violence in Mexico has increased as factions vie to replace imprisoned kingpin El Chapo.

 

Arizona’s border with Mexico sees a disproportionate number of smuggling arrests.

 

Pot dealing arrests are back up to pre-legalization levels in D.C., where REC is legal.

 

Under the auspices of President Rodrigo Duterte’s drug war, Philippine police are extorting families.

 

Jawara McIntosh, son of reggae icon Peter Tosh was beaten and left in a coma in a New Jersey jail where he was serving six months for pot possession.

 

Rapper Jay-Z is taking on the exploitative bail industry. Rapper Taleb Kweli discussed the war on drugs with Vox.

 

A new miniseries looks at drug war hypocrisies.

Product reviews:

*

Culture

In a new music video for, “Wacky Tobaccy,” country star Toby Keith smokes with Willie Nelson.

 

Washington’s 1964 Supply Co. features packaging designed by artists after they ingest cannabis.

 

Willamette Week scoured Portland for places where tourists can get high.

 

The new hip-hop underground is powered by SoundCloud and prescription pills.

 

Marc Emery, Canada’s “prince of pot” took some guff online over a comment he posted about trans-people.

 

Pueblo County, Colo., distributed $420,000 in cannabis-funded scholarships.

 

April Pride of lifestyle brand Van der Pop talked to Playboy about weed and sex.

 

Mendocino Co. (Calif.) grower Soil Bae is Internet famous.

 

L.A. Weekly recommends five apps for stoners.

 

We live in complicated times, so watch this gorilla play in the bath.

 

Here’s the WeedWeek list of pot journalists on Twitter and the list of cannabusiness people on Twitter. Both are works in progress. Recommendations welcome.

I’ve also created two political Twitter lists you can subscribe to: Real News and Tweeting the Resistance.

Want to reach a devoted audience of top cannabis professionals? Advertise in WeedWeek. Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com for details.
Do you think WeedWeek is worth $2 a month? Contribute on Patreon.
Bye,
Alex

Advertising policy: Advertisers and contributors through Patreon have no influence on WeedWeek’s editorial content or on the content of articles that I write for other publications. In an effort to replicate the separation of business and editorial operations practiced at reputable news organizations, a WeedWeek salesperson will be responsible for all sales-related contact with advertisers and will work, as much as possible, without input from me. Any future advertising queries sent to me will be referred to a salesperson. In the newsletter, all ads and other forms of paid content will be clearly marked. I will not approach potential advertisers to solicit business, and reserve the right to reject ads if they present a conflict of interest, the appearance of a conflict of interest or for any other reason.

alexhalperin.com

All rights reserved.

Rolling a Joint with Seth Rogen – from our friends at Merryjane.com

Rolling With Rogen is a new MERRY JANE series, produced by Seth’s own Point Grey Pictures, which gives viewers a chance to learn how to roll something and smoke something directly from someone who clearly knows what he’s talking about. Aside from his involvement with cannabis, Seth is immensely involved and dedicated to his Alzheimer’s charity, Hilarity for Charity.

In this episode, watch and learn from the pro himself, and see how Rogen rolls his joints. If you have never been able to roll a proper missionary joint, this is your best chance. You definitely won’t be able to get it right for a while, but practice makes perfect so keep this video bookmarked in your browser and one day you’ll be able to say, “THANKS FOR TEACHING ME HOW TO ROLL A JOINT, SETH ROGEN!”

MERRY JANE
https://www.merryjane.com/

Follow us!

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/merryjanemedia
Instagram: https://instagram.com/merryjane
Twitter: https://twitter.com/merryjanemedia
Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/merryjane

Cannabisjobs.us
This is WeedWeek, because cannabis news matters.
Like  it on Facebookfollow it on Instagram and Twitter and share it with the link weedweek.net. Subscribers’ names and contact info are confidential. You can also follow me on Twitter.
List your conferences, festivals and parties for free on the site.
Would you appreciate a WeedWeek regional supplement with more news from California and/or Canada? Or more news about the opioid crisis? Sign up at the appropriate link.
If you’d like to advertise in or sponsor any of these projects contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com.
Here’s the news:
Politics

Deputy U.S. Attorney General Rod Rosenstein said the cannabis industry’s legal basis, the Cole Memo, is still in effect. “Maybe there will be changes to it in the future but we’re still operating under that policy, which is an effort to balance the conflicting interests with regard to marijuana.”

The clarification came after Tom Angell broke news that U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions had requested Congress not to renew the Rohrabacher-Farr amendment when it expires in September.

The amendment prohibits the Justice department from spending money to block state-legal MED activity; It has been in effect since December 2014. Sessions wrote that it would be inadvisable to hamper the Justice Department, “particularly in the midst of an historic drug epidemic.”

Sessions took a beating in the press for conflating cannabis legalization and the opioid epidemic. Scientific American and Wired piled on.

 

In Congress, a bipartisan group of lawmakers reintroduced the CARERS Act, that would require the federal government to respect state marijuana laws.

 

Colorado officials responding to the Sessions letter said they like things as they are. Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf promised to protect MED patients from Sessions. Oregon officials discussed the situation with the state’s U.S. attorney.

 

California attorney general Xavier Becerra (D) said a widescale crackdown is unlikely. Speaking at an industry conference, former Mexican President Vicente Fox said Sessions is “crazy.”

 

When President Trump signed a spending bill in May, he issued a signing statement essentially giving himself permission to ignore the Rohrabacher-Farr amendment. Sessions letter was the latest sign that the administration wants to pick a fight with cannabis. During the 2016 campaign Trump was a relatively consistent MED supporter.

 

Sessions also testified to a Senate committee as part of ongoing investigations into the Trump administration.

 

Trump ally and Russia investigation figure Roger Stone says he’s forming a pro-legalization group to sway Trump. Pro-legalization groups like MPP and legalization appear willing to work with Stone.

 

The cannabis industry has some concerns about L.A. City Council’s proposed regulations. In L.A. Weekly I found that cannabis businesses in the world’s largest market are increasingly worried about L.A.P.D. raids.

 

California lawmakers sent new pot rules to Gov. Jerry Brown (D). For more see here.

 

Massachusetts lawmakers may miss their self-imposed deadline to regulate REC.

 

A REC deal may still be possible in Vermont.

 

Pro-pot Colorado Congressman Jared Polis (D) will run for governor.

 

Weed-oriented cryptocurrency PotCoin, which sent Dennis Rodman to North Korea, said the former NBA star deserves credit for the freeing of an American prisoner. The State Department disagrees.

 

The U.S. Senate unanimously condemned, but didn’t change, the country’s hemp laws. The Cannabist has more on the hemp industry’s potential.

 

It’s hard to get MED in New York.

 

Business Insider says Trump’s decision to take a harder line on Cuba abets cocaine smugglers.

 

Entrepreneur and pundit Scott Rasmussen scans the industry.

Business

Henry Wykowski, a lawyer representing Oakland mega-dispensary Harborside, argued against the industry-hated tax rule 280E in court, and says he expects a verdict by the end of this year.

 

Fortune says AG Sessions threatens the industry’s growth. It cites Sentieo data that 75% of public companies involved in cannabis feel Trump’s election poses enough of a threat to list it as a risk for shareholders.

But iAnthus Capital’s Hadley Ford is bullish. (He’s a cannabis investor.)

 

A partnership with MED company UltraHealth has the annual Gathering of Nations in Alberquerque debating whether Native Americans should embrace the cannabis industry.

 

More MED patients are suing after losing their jobs.

 

A big Ontario union said it would cover members’ MED.

 

Massachusetts may impose strict rules on weed ads.

 

Tobacco company Imperial Brands added a cannabis executive to its board. A lawsuit by Nevada’s liquor lobby could delay REC sales in Nevada. The plaintiffs want a piece.

 

Legal REC could be a $5 billion boost to California’s economy according to a state government study. Nationally, the legal industry could have a $70 billion economic impact by 2021.

 

Denver’s proposed rules for social use at existing businesses are restrictive and expensive enough that almost no one is interested.

 

Oregon cannabis entrepreneur Jesce Horton talked about being black in an overwhelmingly white industry.

 

Rev. Al Sharpton, who doesn’t consume, called for more diversity in the industry.

 

Louisiana State University picked a Nevada company to run its MED grow.

 

In a bid to prevent money laundering, the Wynn casino in Las Vegas banned MassRoots CEO Isaac Dietrich.

 

The 2017 Associated Press Stylebook for journalists advises against using nouns like “alcoholic, addict, user and abuser.” Instead it recommends phrases like “he was addicted,” and “people with heroin addiction.” I will likely continue referring to cannabis users since in WeedWeek it doesn’t have a negative connotation.

                                                                       Advertisement

Health and Science

The U.S. Senate may soon pass a sweeping health care bill without public hearings and before it gets any airing before the public. The best guess available is that it will leave 23 million more Americans uninsured. Vox found that eight Republicans who plan to vote for it can’t coherently defend it. Want to learn what you can do? Go here.

 

Utah is the only state to allow cannabis research before legalizing MED, but the approach seems doomed to fail.

 

Sessions anti-pot stance could set back research and MED access for veterans.

 

A group called Friends of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, which has anti-pot activist Kevin Sabet on its board, wants to ease restrictions on cannabis research.

 

More users are seeking voluntary treatment for cannabis abuse.

 

In Kentucky, a lawsuit challenges the state’s MED ban.

 

National Geographic sees more interest in growing cannabis by organic standards.

 

A study from industry data firm BDS Analytics found that cannabis consumers make more money, are more satisfied and like the outdoors better than abstainers.

 

The U.K.’s first MED research facility opens this summer.

 

An Australian dad was convicted of growing MED for his epileptic daughter.

Advertisement

Criminal Justice

A Minnesota jury acquitted cop Jeronimo Yanez of all charges related to his fatally shooting black man Philando Castile. Smelling pot led Yanez to believe Castile was an imminent threat, Yanez’s lawyer said. Castile’s mother responded. After the verdict, Yanez was fired.

 

A study found that legalization hurts cartels and has led to lower crime in border states.

 

Forbes says the war on cannabis is heating up.

 

A Montana MED dispensary owner was sentenced to 18 months in federal prison. The Argus Leader profiles a Sioux Falls, S.D. man returning to life on the outside after 11 years in prison on drug and other charges.

 

Former Colorado marijuana enforcement officer and pot entrepreneur Scott Pack has been indicted in connection with an alleged pot trafficking ring. AG Sessions cited the case as justification for a crackdown.

 

The Better Business Bureau is investigating two Colorado businesses for sending pot through the mail. An Oregon state employee was arrested for allegedly stealing tax payments from a dispensary.

 

Incarceration is way-up in rural America.

 

A Louisiana man was granted a reprieve after serving six years of a 17-year sentence for possessing half an ounce.

 

A British Columbia court ended mandatory minimums for growers.

 

ProPublica looks into how the DEA actions led to a massacre in Allende, Mexico.

 

The DEA recently published a lexicon of American drug slang. One heretofore unknown term for weed is “Smoochy Woochy Poochy.”

 

The N.Y. Times reports that dealers in Asia are using the dark web to sell powerful synthetic opioids to Americans. A interactive graph quiz in the paper shows how bad the opioid epidemic is. A bill proposed by Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) would give AG Sessions new powers to prosecute crimes involving synthetic opioids.

 

A 49-year old Texas woman granted clemency by President Obama for a non-violent drug crime is going back to prison for violating the terms of her supervised release. A Texas inmate charged with possession committed suicide in jail.

 

Samantha Bee took on Jeff Sessions’ drug policies.

Product reviews:

*

Culture

Cannabis personality Cheryl Shuman says she’s selling diamond encrusted vapes, — “pens formerly owned by Russian czars” — for $150,000 in Beverly Hills. If you have purchased such an item, or come across one in the wild, I want to hear about it.

 

Iowa State University lost its second appeal to ban a pro-pot T-shirt with the university’s logo.

 

Snoop Dogg held his first fashion show.

 

Miley Cyrus talked more about quitting pot. She was spending too much time with her pet pig.

 

Urban Daddy says weed has been Whole Foods-ified.

 

The U.K.’s Sun visits a £2million-a-year grow in a former nuclear bunker.

 

Dope Magazine checks out Sri Lanka’s 2,500 year-old MED industry.

 

A company is trying to create a Cannabis Literary Society.

 

High Times listed 11 of its favorite stoner dads.

 

Here’s the WeedWeek list of pot journalists on Twitter and the list of cannabusiness people on Twitter. Both are works in progress. Recommendations welcome.

I’ve also created two political Twitter lists you can subscribe to: Real News and Tweeting the Resistance.

Want to reach a devoted audience of top cannabis professionals? Advertise in WeedWeek. Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com for details.
Do you find WeedWeek valuable? Forward it to someone.
Happy Father’s Day,
Alex

Advertising policy: Advertisers have no influence on WeedWeek’s editorial content or on the content of articles that I write for other publications. In an effort to replicate the separation of business and editorial operations practiced at reputable news organizations, a WeedWeek salesperson will be responsible for all sales-related contact with advertisers and will work, as much as possible, without input from me. Any future advertising queries sent to me will be referred to a salesperson. In the newsletter, all ads and other forms of paid content will be clearly marked. I will not approach potential advertisers to solicit business, and reserve the right to reject ads if they present a conflict of interest, the appearance of a conflict of interest or for any other reason.

alexhalperin.com

All rights reserved.

CBD As an Aid for Mental Health

 

The brain is vastly improved by CBD. CBD does this in an important and complex manner. CBD has no psychoactive effect attached to it. This is because signaling does not originate from the CB2 and CB1 receptors directly. CBD is different from THC which has psychoactive effects attached to it. For many years now THC had monopolized the news but now more and more chose a hybrid and buy marijuana seeds that grow plants of higher percentages of CBD The following are ways by which CBD can help with mental health.

 

 

It has antipsychotic effects

CBD can be used as an antipsychotic medication. It can be used the same way as amisulpride. This makes it perfect for those that suffer from schizophrenia. CBD is preferred by so many people because it has fewer side effects than amisulpride. The effect CBD has on anandamide gives it the antipsychotic effects it possesses. The availability of cannabinoids increases anandamide in the brain.

 

 

It helps to treat depression

There is a serotonin receptor relating directly to depression symptoms that interact with CBD. It has also been discovered that CBD calms those regions that get very active during an anxiety disorder. This is done when CBD reduces the flow of blood to the hypothalamus and other regions of the brain that are connected to anxiety. After treatment with CBD, neurochemical and behavioral studies were conducted on OBX mice that were modified surgically. It was discovered that CBD reversed the inability to feel pleasure which is anhedonia and OBX induced hyperactivity.

 

 

It is used to treat addictions

It was found by Morgan and some other researchers that smokers that were treated with CBD reduced the total number of cigarettes they smoked by 40%. The placebo group had no change in the total number of cigarettes smoked. The capability of CBD to decrease the need for opioids was discovered during preclinical research. But there is still a need to carry out more research on the use of CBD as a cure for addictions.

 

Top 10 Marijuana Discoveries in 2017 by Kurt Darrell

 cannabisjobs.us

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A recent Gallup poll found that roughly 60 percent of U.S. citizens support the legalization of marijuana. As the highest percentage in 47 years, it reveals the popularity of cannabis in the United States. Despite its newfound support, there are still many detractors of marijuana usage; some calling it “harmful,” while others consider it a “gateway drug.” So what is the truth?

 

As the drug continues to gain popularity in American society, new research is being conducted every day that can inform users and keep them up-to-date with new findings on the benefits, and potential side-effects, of using marijuana. Here are 10 of the top marijuana discoveries from 2017 so far.

 

  1. Marijuana Actually Does Relieve Stress

 

While many marijuana users have claimed the drug helps them feel more relaxed and lowers their stress levels, there has not been actual clinical proof that supports these their claims until recently.

 

A new study from the University of Illinois at Chicago found that the main psychoactive compound in marijuana, THC, does reduce stress — although it is in a highly dose-dependent manner. While higher doses of marijuana can potentially lead to increased anxiety, lower level doses were found to reduce stress and prevent  the jittery feelings that many experience before public speaking or being in crowded, or unknown, areas.

 

  1. Marijuana Compounds Can Reduce Seizures

 cannabisjobs.us

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research published in The New England Journal of Medicine presented findings that showed children with Dravet syndrome — a severe form of epilepsy — experienced fewer seizures after ingesting a cannabis compound called “cannabidiol.” Unlike actual marijuana, cannabidiol does not have psychoactive properties.

 

Over a 14 week trial, participants with Dravet syndrome saw monthly seizures drop from an average of 12.4 to an average of 5.9 — a 52 percent decrease. More amazingly, in five percent of patients exposed to the compound, seizures stopped altogether during the study.

 

  1. Marijuana Can Increase Alcohol Use

 

The Research Society on Alcoholism studied any correlation between alcohol use and cannabis use. Their studies concluded that the use of marijuana often increased the likelihood of alcohol users’ transition from one stage of potential alcoholism to the next.

 

While other factors — including “trauma exposures” or “use of marijuana by offspring” — were also linked to transitions, the RSA suggested further research must be conducted on the connection between marijuana and AUDs due to the increased use of cannabis in the United States.

 

  1. Marijuana Found to be Linked to Schizophrenia

 

Scientists at Tel Aviv University have found evidence that shows cannabis may be a trigger for mental issues in adolescents. Their research concluded that while marijuana does not necessarily make users schizophrenic, it could serve as a catalyst for schizophrenia in younger users whose genetics already make them susceptible to the disorder.

 

  1. Marijuana Can Calm Your Gut

 cannabisjobs.us

 

According to new research, marijuana has been found to have much in common with chili peppers. Among the many similarities, both were found to interact with the same receptors in the human stomach, which can keep your gut in balance. These findings could lead to new treatments and therapies for things like diabetes, Crohn’s disease, and colitis.

 

  1. Cannabis Helps with PTSD

 

PTSD affects about 7.7 million American adults, many of whom are American veterans that struggle to find treatment. A new study has received a $2 million grant from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment to study the effectiveness of marijuana used to manage PTSD symptoms. With several different levels of potency and over 50 veteran participants, smoking marijuana may be a big step forward in the mental care of America’s veterans.

 

  1. Marijuana Could Cure Heroin Addiction

 

Cannabinoids — extracts derived from medical marijuana — are now believed to have the ability to help heroin users reduce their cravings and ease their withdrawal symptoms from the opioid. Essentially, the cannabinoids were found to communicate with similiar neurons in the brain that opioids communicate with, just with a much stronger impact. The extracts could provide a more therapeutic alternative without the risk of overdose.

 

  1. Marijuana Could be Good for Your Pets

 

 cannabisjobs.us

2017 may be remembered as the “Year of Animal Cannabis” because more and more pet owners are reporting that they have used marijuana extracts, as well as pet-safe edibles and ointments, to treat their pets’ cancer, seizures, arthritis, and anxiety, with positive results.

 

While many veterinarians do not support this practice, due to a lack of scientific research into the effects of marijuana on animals, many people are discovering that the drug is helping treat their furry friends’ wide range of ailments. This has even led some companies to begin selling cannabis tinctures that can be added to pet foods or administered orally to treat pet illnesses.

 

  1. Marijuana Can Help Cure Cancer

 

In a major medical breakthrough announcement, British company GW Pharmaceuticals has stated that cannabis does, in fact, kill cancer cells.

While the company has been testing medical marijuana’s connection to cancer for years, it only recently released clinical evidence that linked the drug to a reduced mortality rate for people with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) — a form of brain cancer that can kill patients within two years.

 

The U.S. National Cancer Institute, as well as the FDA, have released similar statements that point to synthetic THC as a possible treatment for leukemia and other cancers.

 

  1. Marijuana Could Treat Multiple Sclerosis

 

A study performed at the Canadian University of Manitoba is researching whether cannabinoid treatments can have positive impacts on neuropathic pain caused by multiple sclerosis (MS). The results of the study could help provide support for clinical testing of cannabinoid oil products for MS patients who experience chronic pain. While the research is not a full-blown discovery yet, its potential effects could be wide-ranging and help the more than 2.5 million people around the world who suffer from MS.

 

Going Forward

 cannabisjobs.us

 

With the tremendous rise in popularity of marijuana, and the legalization of it in several states, the need for research into the health benefits — and potential negative effects — of cannabis has never been more important. As scientists discover more uses for the drug, it may not be long before marijuana becomes more than just legal — it could soon become a prime treatment for many illnesses.

 

Images:

 

  1. https://media.defense.gov/2012/Oct/18/2000104778/670/394/0/120926-F-EW478-671.JPG
  2. https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS0poNwv45XRRgX6kH7PXV0sOl6C2onzM1mCztHlgaO-TYXlVchDA
  3. https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2805/11064976153_b869ccdd31.jpg
  4. http://maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com/Summer-Puppy-Cute-Animals-Dog-Rottweiler-Pet-1535961
  5. https://pixabay.com/en/marijuana-cannabis-medical-marijuana-1114713/

Author Bio:

Kurt Darrell is a freelance writer based in Denver, Colorado. He’s been an avid advocate for medical marijuana usage for years and enjoys educating others about its various benefits and uses. When he’s not writing, he’s usually tending to his plants.

Cannabis LAB Broward / W Palm Beach – June 15th, from 6-9pm

Cannabis LAB Broward / W Palm Beach continues its year of programming this month at Truluck’s Ft. Lauderdale. As always, the 3rd Thursdays are our day to think, drink and socialize. This month, on June 15th, from 6-9pm, we invite you to join us for a moderated discussion with our thought leader Dr. Michelle Weiner, DO, MPH.

Presenter:

 

 

Dr. Michelle Weiner, is an Interventional Pain Management Physician board certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation who is one of the Physicians for Spine and Wellness Centers of America. She completed her residency and fellowship training at the University of Miami. Her specialty is focused on prevention, treatment, reversal of health deterioration, increasing function and managing pain. Dr. Weiner focuses on diagnosing and treating spine and musculoskeletal pain as well as chronic migraines. She believes in a holistic approach emphasizing wellness. She is an advocate for medical marijuana. She is passionate about educating other medical professionals about the evidence supporting its benefits for a multitude of different medical conditions through monthly webinars and seminars. Dr. Weiner individualizes medical cannabis treatments based on patient specific factors with the goal of maximizing quality of life. She believes medical cannabis is an excellent option for seniors to help decrease overall pharmaceutical use and minimize medication side effects. Dr. Weiner focuses on decreasing opioid consumption and manages pain with alternative methods. Cannabis is an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anxiolytic, analgesic and has neuroprotective qualities. Dr. Weiner believes the use of medical cannabis in her patients especially the elderly will improve mood, sleep, pain allowing them to enjoy life with less oral medications.

We invite you to join us for an open, moderated discussion on:

 

The Business of Becoming a Qualified Physician for Medical Marijuana

The state maintains a list of physicians that they consider to be qualified to write a prescription for medical marijuana. These physicians have completed a special training course and have met several other state requirements. You can see the current list at the Office of Compassionate Use website. This month Dr. Weiner, will discuss and explore the business concerns related to becoming a qualified physician.

The format will be one hour of education immediately followed by networking ad drinks. Also, as always guests will be treated to two (2) drinks and light appetizers. For members of cLAB the program is free with RSVP and for non members the fee is $50.

Please register now as space is limited.

SPECIAL THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please register now as space is limited.

A recording of the event will be available for registered attendees and members.

Contact us to be a sponsor of Cannabis LAB!

Have questions about Cannabis LAB Broward/W Palm – The Business of Becoming a Qualified Physician for Medical Marijuana? Contact Legal Learning Series

Harvard Study: Smoking Cannabis Actually Improves Brain Function

Preliminary findings from McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Tufts University indicate that pot actually improves cognitive performance.

Credit: Marijuana Stocks

Don’t believe the hype – cannabis is not a gateway drug, it is a medicine. From helping people naturally relieve their anxiety to literally curing cancer (over 100 studies have validated this), the plant is incredibly therapeutic. Because it is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, however, marijuana is still illegal in many U.S. states.

Fortunately, new findings from a study published in Frontiers In Pharmacology seem to support arguments for its decriminalization. Preliminary investigations by medical researchers from McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Tufts University indicate that pot actually improves cognitive performance.

For the study, entitled “Splendor in the Grass? A Pilot Study Assessing the Impact of Medical Marijuana on Executive Function,” behavioral scientists tracked 24 certified medical marijuana patients over a three-month dosing period. The patients were repeatedly measured for cognitive proficiency through a series of intelligence tests, including the STrrop Color Word Test and Trail Making Test.

Lead researcher, Staci Gruber, is the director of the Marijuana Investigations for Neuroscientific Discovery (MIND) program at McLean Hospital. As KINDLAND reports, her initial report is positive. The first benefit reported is that medical marijuana led to patients excelling at brainteasers with enhanced speed and accuracy.

Says the McLean Hospital report:

“After three months of medical marijuana treatment, patients actually performed better, in terms of their ability to perform certain cognitive tasks, specifically those mediated by the frontal cortex,” explained Gruber.

Study participants also reported improvements in their specific clinical conditions, sleep, and overall health as well as a decreased use of conventional medications, particularly opiates.

“We saw a 42 percent reduction in opioid use,” reported Gruber. “This is significant, particularly for those of us in Massachusetts and other areas of the country where the opioid epidemic is ravaging so many. This preliminary finding certainly warrants deeper and broader investigation.”

Credit: Counter Current News

The preliminary findings from the McLean Hospital’s pilot study indicates that humans do receive benefits from smoking cannabis that exceed a temporary reduction of pain and/or anxiety. Considering one of the most common arguments against legalizing cannabis for recreational use is that it makes people lazy and stupid, this data has profound implications.

“People are going to use it,” Gruber concluded. “It’s up to us to figure out the very best and safest ways in which they can do that.”

Read More: http://www.trueactivist.com/harvard-study-smoking-cannabis-actually-improves-brain-function/

Read More: http://www.trueactivist.com/harvard-study-smoking-cannabis-actually-improves-brain-function/

Cannabisjobs.us
This is WeedWeek, because cannabis news matters.
Like  it on Facebookfollow it on Instagram and Twitter and share it with the link weedweek.net. Subscribers’ names and contact info are confidential. You can also follow me on Twitter.
List your conferences, festivals and parties for free on the site.
Would you appreciate a WeedWeek regional supplement with more news from California and/or Canada? Sign up at the appropriate link.
If you’d like to advertise in or sponsor such a project contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com.
I loved Five Came Back, a Netflix miniseries about great Hollywood directors whose propaganda films  supported the allied war effort during World War II.
Here’s the news:
Politics

President Trump called Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte to praise Duterte’s war on drugs. “I just wanted to congratulate you because I am hearing of the unbelievable job on the drug problem,” Trump told Duterte, according to a transcript obtained by The Intercept.  Duterte has attracted international condemnation for the conflict’s thousands of extrajudicial killings.

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott (R) vetoed the REC bill that had passed the legislature. Scott sent it back with concerns about road safety and access for kids. A revised bill could pass during next month’s session. If so, Vermont would be the first state to legalize REC through the legislature. The Burlington Free Press explains.

On Twitter, anti-legalization activist Kevin Sabet claimed some of the credit for the veto.

U.S. House majority leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) apologized to pro-cannabis Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) after a 2016 recording caught McCarthy saying he thinks Russian president Vladimir Putin pays Rohrabacher and then candidate Donald Trump. Rohrabacher denied accepting money from Putin.

Canada wants to maintain the “spirit” of its international treaty commitments, while legalizing REC, which violates the letter of those commitments.

The L.A. Times looks at how states are moving to protect their cannabis industries in the event of a federal crackdown. The paper also learns that product testing in California is likely to be delayed by months.

Trump’s proposed budget included massive cuts to most discretionary programs, but not the drug czar’s office, despite earlier threats. Lawmakers worried that zero-ing out the office would exacerbate the opioid crisis.

Boston mayor and legalization opponent Marty Walsh (D), blasted the suburbs that have banned pot shops. “If they voted for it, they should have a pot shop in their neighborhood, they shouldn’t have to drive to Boston for it,” he said.

Cleveland is reconsidering its ban on MED grows.

Both houses of Oregon’s legislature have voted to strengthen MED tracking rules in a bid to keep U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions at bay.

Miami New Times discovers that the Miami city attorney who compared MED to pedophilia has a history of sexual harassment.

After the state legislature couldn’t reach a deal, the Florida Health department released a framework for MED regulation. In other news, Gov. Rick Scott (R)  vetoed a much debated bill that would allow liquor sales at Wal-Mart and other big box stores.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey (R) vetoed industrial hemp growing. In addition, a state study contradicted Ducey’s assertion that legalizing REC last year would have drained state coffers.

It’s hard to be a MED activist in Utah.

Conservative veterans group The American Legion wants the Trump administration to reschedule cannabis to enable medical research.

Embattled Trump advisor Roger Stone will be a keynote speaker at a cannabis conference in New York. Stone tweeted: “I will reveal my plans to convince @realDonaldTrump to reaffirm his support for State’s Rights when it comes to marijuana on June 16.” (The conference declined to comment to WeedWeek on whether it was paying Stone. Stone did not respond to a Twitter message.)

An essay in the Wall Street Journal argues that the return of federalism — states’ rights — on the left is good for America.

Under new president Emmanuel Macron, France is moving towards decriminalization.

Home growing MED is increasingly popular in Chile, a country considered one of the most conservative in South America. MED is also available in some Santiago pharmacies.

A leftist political party in Malta wants to legalize cannabis and decriminalize all drugs.

Business

A Florida lawyer and a California real estate entrepreneur separately announced plans to each invest $100M in cannabis. The Miami Herald profiles John Morgan. I spoke with Paul Daneshrad for L.A. Weekly.

At the other end of the economic spectrum, I wrote about L.A. budtenders, and what it’s like to have one of the newest jobs in the country.

Cannabis breathalyzer company Hound Labs raised $8.1M in a round led by blue chip venture capital firm Benchmark Capital, which is known for its investments in Uber, Dropbox, Snap and other big tech companies.

To test another breathalyzer, Washington State University researchers are looking for subjects willing to smoke weed for science.

Facebook shut down an Arizona legalization group’s page. “My heart’s like, sort of broken,” Safer Arizona chair David Wisniewski said.

Social network MassRoots said it needs to raise $5M in the next year to stay in business.

A judge suspended MED licensing in Maryland because the approval process failed to deliver racial diversity.

Wired spoke to pot start-ups about surviving in the Trump era.

Producer Vireo claims to have launched the first MED ad campaign in the New York City subway.

More companies claim to make faster acting edibles.

New Mexico Political Report finds “glaring discrepancies” in records kept by several state MED companies; at least five claim to have sold more product than they produced.

The SEC temporarily suspended trading in cannabis stocks Eco Science Solutions (ESSI) and Holy Grail Company (HGRL).

In Oregon, REC is absorbing the MED market.

A Rhode Island judge has ruled against a company that declined to hire a MED user for an internship.

The L.A. Times writes about Adelanto, a desert city that’s becoming a growing hub. At present the town’s main industry is prisons. I wrote about Adelanto last month.

Local California governments may struggle to cash in on the green rush, CALmatters says.

On Fox News, Home Depot co-founder Ken Langone said, “People use food stamps to buy marijuana, that’s illegal, or cocaine, or whatever the hell else people use to get high. How do we make sure that we don’t take a system that is well-intentioned that becomes badly abused?” (WeedWeek is not aware of any dispensaries or cocaine dealers who accept food stamps.)

L.A. Weekly profiles Bonita “Bo” Money, a businesswoman and activist who’s trying to diversify the cannabis industry. Leafly says Washington state laws impede racial equity in the industry.

Delivery services have popped up in D.C. Their legality is dubious.

Some women of retirement age are starting cannabis companies.

Following a vote, the National Cannabis Industry Association announced its new board of directors.

Whoopi Goldberg, who’s name is on a line of cannabis products aimed at women, supports a New York effort to include severe menstrual cramps as a qualifying condition for MED.


Advertisement

Health and Science

The first large-scale clinical trial showed that a GW Pharmaceuticals’ CBD drug epidiolex reduced seizures in children with Dravet syndrome. Access the study in the New England Journal of Medicine here. Following successful clinical trials, the U.K. company is applying for approval to sell its cannabis derived epilepsy drug Epidiolex in the U.S.

St. Louis ER doctors are using a cream made from capsaicin, an ingredient in hot peppers, to treat cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome, a condition that can arise from very heavy cannabis use.

Israeli research on rats suggests cannabinoids might treat traumatic brain injury.

Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) introduced a bill to facilitate MED research.

The Journal Epilepsy & Behavior devoted an entire issue to cannabinoid science.

Philadelphia librarians have grown accustomed to patrons overdosing on opioids. Two drug counselors died of overdoses at a halfway house outside Philadelphia. The latter article notes that addicts actively seek out batches of heroin that have killed people.

Colorado is using pot taxes to fund treatment for opioid addicts.

A Georgia student is suing his high school for not letting him bring his state-approved MED on campus.

A product called Carcinoblock claims to neutralize he carcinogens in bong smoke.

A study suggested using psychedelics makes people more liberal.

Criminal Justice

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been widely criticized for his drive to restore mandatory minimum sentences, but he has support from the National Association of Assistant U.S. Attorneys, a conservative bloc. For more see here.

The New Republic uncovers a memo from 1982 in which Sessions, then a U.S. attorney, called for the kinds of policies he’s enacting now. “The liberals will buzz about with agonizing whines,” Sessions wrote. “After they have come forth and identified themselves as sympathizers for drug smugglers and other assorted criminals, congregating about the bait, they should then be flattened by the President [Reagan].”

“Violent crime surged, federal drug prosecutions fell. We’re going to reverse that trend,” Sessions said this week. “There’s been too much legalization talk and not enough prevention talk.”

The N.Y. Review of Books calls Sessions “More Dangerous Than Trump.” The administration’s proposed budget includes $84M to the Justice Department “for increases in the federal detainee population.” (That link, to Mother Jones, also explains how the budget “screws everyone but the filthy rich.”)

Acting DEA chief Chuck Rosenberg reiterated his assertion that marijuana is not medicine.

More Canadians are being barred for life from entering the U.S. after saying that they have used marijuana at some point. It’s a bonanza for Canadian immigration lawyers.

Several Colorado businesses say the IRS is overstepping its authority by using Colorado state pot databases to investigate marijuana crimes unrelated to taxes.

An Arizona judge overturned a man’s misdemeanor pot conviction in ruling that being in a high crime neighborhood and with someone who ran away, wasn’t sufficient grounds for a frisking by police.

San Diego district attorney Bonnie Dumanis filed criminal charges against a cannabis entrepreneur two weeks after she was ordered to return $100,000 seized from , James Slatic. The raid in question took place in January 2016.

A South Dakota jury found out-of-state consultant Eric Hagen not guilty of charges related to his work on an aborted effort to create a pot resort on a tribal reservation.

The attorney of a West Virginia woman who pleaded guilty to second degree murder, said she had had a “substance-induced psychotic” reaction from smoking pot the night before the killing.

Most Canadians want the federal government to pardon past marijuana offenses. More than 2,500 Californians have applied for their convictions to be reduced or erased under the state’s REC law. It’s not clear how many request have been granted.

Manchester, U.K. suicide bomber Salman Abedi was an occasional cannabis user.

Here’s how Riverside, Calif, managed to close all 118 of its MED dispensaries within 10 years.

An Ohio Supreme Court judge called for the state to decriminalize.

Louisiana is the nation’s incarceration capital. Slate looks at a failed reform effort.

A man in Wyoming who told police that some of his stash was stolen was arrested for possessing the rest.

Shots were fired but no one was injured in a botched D.C. dispensary robbery.

Product reviews:

*

Culture

Denver 4/20 rally organizers have been banned from Civic Center Park for three years after leaving the site in bad disrepair this April.

The ACLU is suing the Rolla, Mo. library for blocking a MED activist from hosting a meeting.

Rolling Stone attends, “The best pot party in California.

Denver artists say the cannabis industry is driving up real estate prices to unaffordable levels.

A letter writer to the Denver Post doesn’t want to smell his neighbors’ weed. A Minnesota man mistakenly donated more than 100 grams of pot to a clothing drive.

Longtime British Columbia cannabis activist Ted Smith is retiring with plans to create a line of herbal teas.

The Decemberists’ frontman Colin Meloy imagined life as a budtender.

Here’s the WeedWeek list of pot journalists on Twitter and the list of cannabusiness people on Twitter. Both are works in progress. Recommendations welcome.

I’ve also created two political Twitter lists you can subscribe to: Real News and Tweeting the Resistance.

Want to reach a devoted audience of top cannabis professionals? Advertise in WeedWeek. Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com for details.

Do you find WeedWeek valuable? Forward it to someone.
Alex
Advertising policy: Advertisers have no influence on WeedWeek’s editorial content or on the content of articles that I write for other publications. In an effort to replicate the separation of business and editorial operations practiced at reputable news organizations, a WeedWeek salesperson will be responsible for all sales-related contact with advertisers and will work, as much as possible, without input from me. Any future advertising queries sent to me will be referred to a salesperson. In the newsletter, all ads and other forms of paid content will be clearly marked. I will not approach potential advertisers to solicit business, and reserve the right to reject ads if they present a conflict of interest, the appearance of a conflict of interest or for any other reason.
alexhalperin.com

All rights reserved.

Cannabisjobs.us
This is WeedWeek, because cannabis news matters.
Like  it on Facebookfollow it on Instagram and Twitter and share it with the link weedweek.net. Subscribers’ names and contact info are confidential. You can also follow me on Twitter.
List your conferences, festivals and parties for free on the site.
Would you appreciate a WeedWeek regional supplement with more news from California and/or Canada? Sign up at the appropriate link.
If you’d like to advertise in or sponsor such a project contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com.
Here’s the news:
Politics

Conservatives criticized U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions for his decision to roll back Obama-era measures that shortened sentences for drug offenders.

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who voted to approve Sessions, said drug use is not a “lock ‘em up and throw away the key’ problem” He supports a bipartisan bill that would counter Sessions.

The conservative Charles Koch Institute found that eight out of ten Trump voters want to see shorter drug sentences. The Federalist says Sessions “has neither the authority nor the evidence to pursue a new drug war.”

Sessions’ move, the N.Y. Times notes,  “ran so contrary to the growing bipartisan consensus coursing through Washington.”The paper also explains how Sessions’ guidance would jack up sentencesReason has more.

Despite Sessions, some states are trying to reduce penalties.

Sessions aggressive stance “creates a lot of uncertainty and that uncertainty is deeply concerning for patients and providers,” Michael Collins of the Drug Policy Alliance told the Washington Post. “We had thought medical marijuana wasn’t really in play in terms of a crackdown.” MJ Biz Daily has more. So does CNBC.

Pro-legalization Congressman Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.) argued that legalization looks inevitable. “Trump is essentially irrelevant.”

In 2016, a recording caught House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R.-Calif.) saying “There’s two people I think Putin pays: Rohrabacher and Trump.” Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) is among the most pro-cannabis members of Congress. Republicans have tried to brush aside McCarthy’s remarks as a joke.

The California government is starting to collect feedback on proposed cannabis regulations.

Leafly asks why legalization pushes failed in Texas.

Montana Congressional candidate Rob Quist (D), who’s running in a May 25 special election, ducked out of an interview rather than discuss past marijuana use, that came out in a 20-year old malpractice lawsuit he had filed against a doctor. He later copped to receiving a citation in 1971.

Worried that it would undermine efforts to fight the opioid crisis, New Hampshire Senators Jeanne Shaheen (D) and Maggie Hassan (D) oppose the Trump administration’s plan to gut the Office of National Drug Control Policy.

Both sides are lobbying Vermont Gov. Phil Scott (R) on the REC bill passed by the state legislature. If he doesn’t sign it by Wednesday it automatically becomes law.

Florida ordered a dispensary to stop selling a product that could be smoked. Maryland approved its first MED grow. For the first time, Oregon’s economic forecast accounts for cannabis.

MJ Biz Daily interviewed Anne McLellan, who led Canada’s marijuana task force, on the road to legalization.

Colorado lawmakers haven’t passed social use because they can’t decide on the meaning of “open and public” consumption.

Iowa and Minnesota are trying to work out a way for Iowans to buy MED from Minnesota, despite interstate commerce laws. If successful it would be the first example of cannabis remaining state-legal after it crossed state lines.

In L.A., I found that “rogue dispensaries” are a source of resentment.

Miami Deputy City Attorney Barnaby Min compared legalizing MED to legalizing pedophilia.

U.K. Prime Minister Teresa May has no intention of legalizing. She considers it a gateway drug.

Philippine president Rodrigo Duterte pushed back an impeachment attempt related to his war on drugs. He’s also cracking down on public tobacco use.

Advertisement

Business

Cannabis executives were in D.C. this week making the case for banking and fair taxation. Quartz suggests that cannabis is just one of many industries unlikely to see its agenda advance amid the Trump administration’s scandals. Rolling Stone has more.

Vice suggests that Canadian companies’ “first mover advantage” will lead to global domination. New Cannabis Ventures says the plant is now a global investing opportunity.

A bill with bipartisan support in Congress would make banking easier for cannabis companies.
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D) signed a bill that will enable the state to create the first market for certified organic cannabis.
Minnesota’s two MED businesses have lost $11M in two years of sales, the AP reported.

In California’s Salinas Valley, the decorative flower industry is giving way to a new kind of flower. Farther north, in cannabis friendly Santa Rosa, a housing developer doesn’t want to build apartments close to a large grow.
Media company Civilized was involved in an ill-conceived promotion which it ended.

Starbucks contacted the activist known as NJ Weedman after signage for his WeedBukx cafe resembled the coffee company’s mermaid logo.
The Alaska Grown logo that appears on state-grown produce won’t be on cannabis anytime soon.

A PayPal executive is joining cannabis enterprise software company Kind Financial.
LAist runs through 10 popular products that could become illegal under proposed California regulations, including chocolate covered espresso beans (caffeine), Ganjalato (dairy) and free samples.

The N.Y. Times visits the “largest vertical farm in the world,” in Newark, N.J.
More American workers are testing positive for cocaine, marijuana and meth.

Founding editor of The Cannabist Ricardo Baca is starting a content agency called Grasslands. He spoke to Green State.
Americans are spending more on weed than on erectile dysfunction pills. The same study thinks U.S. REC sales could surpass MED sales this year.

Brad Nattrass, CEO of urban-gro in Lafayette, Colo. is running for the National Cannabis Industry Association board. He submitted the following statement in support of his candidacy:
I am Brad Nattrass, CEO of urban-gro. Our team of nearly 30 employees, located across the country, works with large-scale cultivation facilities to provide advanced technology products and systems solutions.

Our company was honored to be awarded an inaugural Cannavation Award for Cultivation at the NCIA Seed to Sale Show earlier this year.

As a member of the NCIA board, I will be of service to NCIA and my fellow members in three ways:

·         First, bringing attention to the challenges faced by cultivators in every region of the country.

I bring the pulse of cultivators on a national scale. Because urban-gro sells to hundreds of commercial cultivation facilities in every stage of development, we have a unique opportunity to learn about the specific concerns and challenges that growers face in all regions of the country.

·         Second, bringing a network of professionals to drive NCIA membership and sponsorship.

·         Third, providing a relentless entrepreneurial drive to make a difference.

I have an incredible drive. I am an entrepreneur with an MBA, and over a decade of experience in large-scale agriculture. I am a solutions focused individual that rises to the occasion when I encounter challenges.

I believe in the important work NCIA does on behalf of the cannabis industry. I will be honored and humbled if you vote for me to join the NCIA Board of Directors.

#VoteBradNCIA

For more info on voting see here.


Advertisement

Health and Science

Genetically modified weed is probably inevitable.

A Canadian study suggests cannabis can help wean crack addicts. Canada is trying to rein in the cost of MED for veterans.

Vox says the stricter sentences favored by AG Sessions could push up the HIV rate by incentivizing needle sharing.

L.A. Weekly meets the Battlefield Foundation where cannabis is part of the program for PTSD-scarred veterans.

A New Hampshire doctor was reprimanded for recommending MED to a patient with past pot convictions.

When giving an elephant LSD, make sure to calculate the correct dose.

National Geographic has a photo essay on street pharmacists in Haiti.

Criminal Justice

The National District Attorneys Association published a report on state cannabis enforcement that’s pretty vague in its recommendations on the Cole Memo and other key issues. See the report here.

In Washington, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, urged the U.S. to step up international crime-fighting efforts and reduce its focus on drugs.

Milwaukee County Sheriff, conservative pundit, and tough on crime zealot David Clarke says he’s taking a job with the Department of Homeland Security.

A consultant who helped a South Dakota Native American tribe in its aborted effort to set up a cannabis industry is going on trial. A South Dakota reporter has been subpoenaed to testify.

I was subpoenaed for my Pando story on the rise and fall of a modern weed dealer.

In one Virginia County, blacks are six times as likely as whites to be arrested for weed possession. Two deputy sheriffs in Kern County, California (Bakersfield) pled guilty to selling seized weed. “I made the decision based on Satan playing games with me and making me feel like I was prideful,” one of them said.

The Minnessota cop who fatally shot Philando Castile will stand trial for manslaughter May 30. A judge ruled that his defense can bring up Castile’s marijuana use on the day of the shooting but not Castile’s earlier use.

Mexican journalist Javier Valdez, who was known for his brave coverage of the country’s drug war, was shot dead in the state of Sinaloa.

A federal appeals court declined to rule on whether federal prisons can hold offenders who operated within state law. The case involved a California man who went to prison in 2014.

According to the FBI, a suburban Detroit man tried to bribe officials to get a dispensary license.

Cops in Bismarck, N.D. are cracking down on CBD products. (North Dakota voters legalized MED last year.)

Residents of Durango, Col., are upset about a Fox News story that they say distorted the truth to make the mountain tourist town look like a mecca for panhandlers.

The Trump administration is expanding its use of for-profit prisons to hold undocumented immigrants.

In Alaska, cops can’t own pot shops.

The New Yorker has a photo essay on the ravages of drug smuggling in the Brazilian Amazon. Jon Lee Anderson writes: “We are left with the alarming realization that destruction comes in stages—that the end of nature in the Amazon will likely not terminate with the extinction of its forests but transmute into some new murderous end-game that will carry on, long after the last tree is felled.”

Product reviews:

*

Culture

Oregon Live says the NFL’s refusal to reinstate Cleveland Browns wide receiver Josh Gordon, for cannabis use is “simply absurd” compared to the league’s record of forgiving players who abused women and committed other violent crimes.

Buzzfeed meets pro-cannabis Christians in the deep south. Texas activist Lydia Decker named her organization Genesis 1:29 for the Bible verse that begins “And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed…”

The New Yorker’s Nick Paumgarten visits a bong art show: “Delicate leaves and lace, tubes within tubes, ghouls embedded inside chambers like ships in bottles. One object widely admired by the other lampworkers was a pea-green monster truck with big black tires and flames exuding from six tailpipes—every inch of it glass. Mais oui: Ceci, c’est une pipe.”

There’s an annual todo about whether a big fake joint can be in a July 4 parade in suburban Tampa.

Hollywood legend Cary Grant turned to LSD therapy. Famed LSD chef Nicholas Sand died.

NASCAR vetoed a weed logo on a car. In 1986, four Indy 500 drivers were convicted of pot trafficking.

Willie Nelson said Jeff Sessions shouldn’t opine on drugs unless the attorney general has tried them.

Here’s the WeedWeek list of pot journalists on Twitter and the list of cannabusiness people on Twitter. Both are works in progress. Recommendations welcome.

I’ve also created two political Twitter lists you can subscribe to: Real News and Tweeting the Resistance.

Want to reach a devoted audience of top cannabis professionals? Advertise in WeedWeek. Contact Adrienne Nascimento at weedweekads@gmail.com for details.

Do you find WeedWeek valuable? Forward it to someone.
Alex
Advertising policy: Advertisers have no influence on WeedWeek’s editorial content or on the content of articles that I write for other publications. In an effort to replicate the separation of business and editorial operations practiced at reputable news organizations, a WeedWeek salesperson will be responsible for all sales-related contact with advertisers and will work, as much as possible, without input from me. Any future advertising queries sent to me will be referred to a salesperson. In the newsletter, all ads and other forms of paid content will be clearly marked. I will not approach potential advertisers to solicit business, and reserve the right to reject ads if they present a conflict of interest