Posts Tagged “Cannabis Jobs Seattle”

Cannabisjobs.us

VANCOUVER, WASH. — Washington’s marijuana business has created a legal occupation that offers career opportunities for bud trimmers, according to The Columbian and The Associated Press.

Read more at: http://marijuana.heraldtribune.com/2015/04/07/marijuana-trimmers-see-career-potential/

“I’ve done everything from pumping gas to remodeling houses, but I think there’s longevity in this,” 32-year-old bud trimmer Kurt Vermillion told The Columbian. “I think there’s lots of growing room in this industry. I want to do whatever they need me to do.”

Bud trimmers make between $12 and $15 an hour and use small scissors to trim away leaves and other things from marijuana buds. Most trimmers work on about a pound to a pound and a half of marijuana per day.

Experienced workers can move up to gardeners or concentrate makers and make $50,000 to $90,000 a year.

For 37-year-old Julie Whittaker, who started trimming buds in November, the job turned out to be less stressful than her former work in the banking software industry.

“I’ve been learning my way as I go,” she said. “I’m intrigued by this whole industry. It’s a big shift for me, and honestly I find it to be better regulated than even my old career in banking.”

Vermillion and Whittaker work at Cedar Creek Cannabis, where Mark Michaelson, head of operations, is eyeing ways to hold onto workers. The company has 14.

“We want to work on employee retention,” he said. “Eventually we’ll have health and dental insurance and full benefits for them, too.”

Clark County has eight growers that have been approved by the Liquor Control Board, and five stores have opened in Clark County so far and two more are planning to open within two months.

Before the legalization of marijuana, bud trimmers migrated from job to job and were paid in cash by the pound and risked arrest. Now, bud trimmers typically make an hourly wage, though some are paid by the pound.

“I think what happens is people think in this industry, people are just hanging out and maybe even smoking,” said 32-year-old Brittny Houghton, 32, whose family owns Cedar Creek Cannabis. “But that’s not what we do. It’s a real job, it’s 9 to 5, you have to be on time, you don’t have to be a smoker, and the quality of the work is important.”

At CannaMan Farms, another marijuana business, owner Brian Stroh said trimmers come from a variety of backgrounds.

“It’s a business that people who work hard can move up in,” he said.

The Emerald City’s second recreational marijuana shop is rolling in the green. Nearly $14K in Daily Revenues for Seattle Rec Shop

Uncle Ike’s, which opened on Sept. 30, averaged$13,736 in sales per day in its first week of operation. That equates to about $3,500 in excise tax revenue for the state each day.

If the pace holds up, the store could generate $4.8 million in recreational marijuana sales.

Uncle Ike’s began serving customers more than two months after the start of recreational sales in the state, becoming just the second shop in Seattle to open.

The store recorded almost $17,000 in revenues on its first day of sales as customers lined up around the block.

Ike’s was also the target of a local protest recently, with parishioners from a nearby church calling for the store to be shut down.

Cannabis Jobs – Moms for Marijuana International has named the vibrant mother-daughter team, Cheryl Shuman as its next Executive Director and Aimee Shuman as Deputy Director. Cheryl Shuman will take the role of Executive Director, bringing her 25 years skills of public relations, media, product branding, and business development to the blossoming non-profit organization. Aimee Shuman will continue to support her mother and join in her astounding work in the Marijuana Moms Movement, through her position as Deputy Director. The dynamic Cannabis duo will become the new faces and representatives of the Moms for Marijuana mission effective on May 11, 2014 – just in time for Mother’s Day.

Moms for Marijuana

Former Executive Director, Serra Frank, said, “Cheryl and Aimee have accomplished so much extraordinary progress in Cannabis reform, world wide, reaching millions of parents through the utilization of mainstream media. It was an easy decision,” said Frank. “Everything I have ever seen them do has been historic and monumental in Cannabis reform. Together, they will lead the Executive Direction of Moms for Marijuana into the future.”

Cheryl, who will take over as Executive Director for Ms. Frank, said, “I’ve known Serra for many years now and have always been inspired by her vision and dedication to moms and parents around the world. I am honored by the opportunity to join such a dynamic and ambitious organization, with such a clear and focused mission—improving the lives of the world’s most vulnerable, women and children. Our partnership with Moms creates a wonderful opportunity for women around the world to follow in the footsteps of Pauline Sabine from the 1930′s who led a group of dedicated women to overturn alcohol prohibition. Today, we are witnessing the beginning to the end of cannabis prohibition.”

Frank will retain her position as the Founding Director of Moms for Marijuana. “I have also taken on the task of being the Director of the Official Mom Squad (the organization’s membership),” she said, “to continue to guide Moms for Marijuana into becoming everything I have ever envisioned.”

Deputy Director Aimee Shuman states, “Women are the secret to legalization. We are the family decision makers and influencers in society. After all, women buy 85% of all household and consumer products, according to Adweek. Now we can use that influence to change laws, save lives, families and introduce parents to new possible careers in the green rush. As an entrepreneur, it’s exciting to be on the ground floor of the cutting edge of making news and witnessing the convergence of celebrity and cannabis culture.”

“The right leadership team is everything. Working with Cheryl and Aimee these past few years, it was evident immediately that it was a perfect fit in terms of values, integrity and personality. The addition of Aimee and Cheryl Shuman on our team elevates Mom’s stature, adding prestige and thus creating a positive ‘halo’ around the organization. The value of their ability to provide global celebrity and media exposure for our organization are priceless,” said Serra Frank, Founder of Moms for Marijuana International.

About Moms for Marijuana International:

Moms for Marijuana International is a grassroots network and organization of parents and other citizens across the world who are concerned with what they consider an ignorant war that continues to be fought against the Cannabis (Hemp or Marijuana) plant, and how it is negatively affecting the future generations of this earth. They focus on raising awareness, promoting education, and cultivating discussion about every aspect of the Cannabis plant, its history and prohibition, as well as the potential it has for the future.

Since its creation, by Serra Frank in 2005, Moms for Marijuana has grown into a global organization of parents actively working to change the stigma that surrounds the Cannabis plant and its consumers. Moms for Marijuana has a twitter following of 22,000 people, and a facebook following of over 225,000. In 2012, they also started a sister chapter called Parents for Marijuana, that has a facebook following of over 30,000.

Frank says, “Everything in life changes, and we must change with it. The only constant in life is that continuous change. We have recreated ourselves and our group numerous times over the last 10 years, and now it’s time to do it again. We have been working to redesign our website and hope to have it published soon. It is our intention that, through our website and our presence, we will help to educate the world’s parents about all aspects of Cannabis, and bring attention to the dire need for global examination and re-utilization of this extremely beneficial plant.” http://www.MomsForMarijuana.org

About Cheryl Shuman Inc. :

Cheryl Shuman’s TV reality started at age three with Charles Kuralt. By age seventeen, she had made several television appearances and was offered to appear regularly on The Bob Braun Show on WLWT-TV in Cincinnati, which led to a national recurring segment on PM Magazine. At age twenty-three, Cheryl relocated to Los Angeles to become know as the “Optician to the Stars” and created a new business, Starry Eyes. As CEO of Starry Eyes, Cheryl worked on some of the biggest films, TV, and music properties generating multi-million dollar revenues. This success led to her own show on the QVC network and a mutually rewarding seven-year relationship that included product placement, production and branded entertainment divisions.

In 2006, Shuman was diagnosed with cancer. After years of following failed allopathic medicine treatments, she opted for medical cannabis in the form of raw juice and oils as an alternative. Her success using medical cannabis led her to found the Beverly Hills Cannabis Club. Today, Cheryl is the most visible and recognizable woman in the medical marijuana reform movement, recently receiving the 2013 Activist of the Year Award at Seattle Hempfest. Together Cheryl and Aimee, her daughter and EVP of Cheryl Shuman, Inc., have reached over 100 million viewers worldwide while appearing on such mainstream shows as CNN’s Piers Morgan Live, The Katie Couric Show, The View, ABC’s 20/20, Good Morning America, Fox Business News and many other media outlets. Cheryl Shuman is represented by the prestigious William Morris Endeavor Agency in Beverly Hills. For more information, please visit CherylShuman.com.

Source: PRWeb

Cannabis Jobs – The Best Pot-Related Jobs in the Cannabis Industry

5501507498_59b5118c78_z.jpg
Photo by Dank Depot via flickr

 

Hey, so you know how pot is legal in some states, but totally not in Florida? Yeah, well, we’re not only missing out on those fancy tax dollars, but we’re also missing out on some serious business opportunities.

When surveying the dismal unemployment numbers, it may seem a thing of the past, and you may be right — for your state, anyway. But if you happen to reside in one of the states where pot is legal, job growth is actually a pretty common thing.

You see, folks, when you stop policing an entire plant like cannabis, and allow for it to be legally bought and sold instead, this magical thing happens — new businesses start to appear — and new jobs spring forth all willy-nilly. Crazy, I know, but it happens.

And those new businesses and new jobs are happening all over places like Colorado and Washington. Take, for instance, the grow shop. Don’t know what that is? Well, it’s the place where pot is legally cultivated, from seedling to massive plant. Those shops need folks to keep ’em running.

Or how about the medical aspect of pot? Yep, you guessed it. Medical professionals are needed to diagnose and prescribe, and office staff goes hand in hand with that type of business. So you don’t even have to be a medical doctor to land a job in medical marijuana; you just have to be able to set appointments or file paperwork.

But as great as those jobs sound, there are even better ones to be had in the pot industry. Don’t believe us? See below. But be careful; the word “budtender” may accidentally blow your mind.

3326238955_c9bec05717.jpg
Photo by Neeta Lind via flickr

Budtenders
Oh, yes. The “budtender.” So think bartender, but with bud, and a decidedly less-handsy crowd to deal with. The budtender knows all things bud, from what the strain’s potency is to what to expect from the plant. The difference between the flowers, the concentration of the strain, or what an edible is; the budtender knows it all. 

They’re like a walking encyclopedia of weed knowledge, the budtender, and they see the purchase through from start to finish in the dispensary, doing everything from answering questions about what it’s like to be high to weighing the bud and passing it along to the happy customer. In a nutshell, the job of a budtender is a big ball of awesome.

Cultivation Experts
Are you a phytochemist? What about a biochemist? A horticulturist? No? Just a closet pot-grower with a serious green thumb? Well, come one, come all — the legal pot industry is begging for folks who can work in the grow phase of the marijuana biz. You’re especially important if you have a scientific background, but even if you’re just wanting to bust into the pot business, there are jobs available for growers, trimmers and farm labor a’plenty.

Side note: It’s kind of awesome to think of all the Ag and farm kids from Texas heading up to Colorado or Washington in their boots, isn’t it?

 

3330185079_6dc1743d85_z.jpg
Photo by Sids1 via flickr

Delivery Agents

Yeah, it’s a weird concept for those of us in states where weed is still illegal, but in some states, you no longer have to buy your pot out of the back of some dude’s van while looking over your shoulder. Delivery agents are needed to secure the transport of the very legal plants to and from wherever they’re ending up — presumably the dispensaries, the grow shops, or wherever else it’s legal to deliver them to.

In reality, we don’t live in a state where we can legally drive around a carload of pot plants, so we have no clue where they go, or what you’d be doing other than driving, but it still sounds kind of super awesome, no?

 

6973769573_ece67c54a9.jpg
Photo by tanjila via flickr

Weed Consultant
This is a real, legit position offered by the awesome folks in Washington state, and it is what it sounds like: they need a well-educated stoner to educate lawmakers and elected officials on everything ganja-related. No, you’re not hallucinating.

 

The folks in charge of the state of Washington, who have presumably been abstaining from the underground supply of weed olde, need a lesson in the best practices to grow, dry, test, label, and package weed. Oh, and they also need to know how to get it into food products without it tasting awful. Turns out all those years of perfecting my pot brownie recipes were not in vain, mom. Go figure.

Strain Reviewer
Oh, man. The strain reviewer. This job sure is a real thing, despite it sounding too good to be true, and plenty of media outlets and Web sites are hiring pot reviewers to give their critical opinions on the bud being sold in their area. It’s hard work, but someone’s got to do it, we guess.

Not only are there pot plants to review, but there are editors who are needed to be editing those reviews, and writers to, well, write stuff about the pot industry, too. Cannabis, savin’ lives and journalism, one pot job at a time.

Cannabis Marketing
So, branding. Everything needs a brand, even pot. And there’s a great need for cannabis campaign creators, who can help a strain or a dispensary develop a personal brand. This also seems like an awesome job. What better way to use your business sense than to parlay it into some Cheech and Chong skit that’s set in an advertising agency? Well, that’s how we picture cannabis branding going, anyway.

There’s also a need for account executives and advertising reps who can specialize in cannabis. So if you’re in sales, you may want to think about transitioning over to the dark (green) side.

Pot Chefs
So, edibles. Edibles are super necessary for people who either can’t or don’t want to take part in the more traditional methods of inhaling pot. From the legalization has sprung a new industry, which focuses on the art of baking or creating high-end pot edibles. Pot delicacies are in high demand, and if you’re a chef or baker with any interest in getting people stoned, you may want to head on down to where pot is legal. Cause chances are, they’ll need your expertise.

 

Kentucky - Free the Weed

Kentucky – Free the Weed

 

Cannabis News – The Kentucky Health Issues Poll shows that 78 percent of those individuals that       participated in the polling support legalizing marijuana for medicinal dedications and 40    percent of those polled are in support of legalizing the plant for any purpose adults see fit.

Find Cannabis Jobs

The poll in question validates a previous polling released back in May which was    conducted by the Institute for Policy Research at the University of Cincinnati which  revealed that approximately 80 percent of those Kentuckians that participated supported  the legalization of marijuana for medical purposes. Furthermore, May’s polling View Post  results share similarities with the most recent survey due to the fact that 38 percent of t  those polled stated that they favor the legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes.

Earlier this year Kentucky lawmakers approved a measure that legalizes the cultivation of hemp for industrial and commercial purposes once the federal government grants states the right to legally cultivate the crop. The latest surveys show that Kentuckians not only want to bring an end to the prohibition of hemp farming but also are very eager to see the reforming of the current laws regarding marijuana. All of those supporting legalization also know how much money will come in to the state for Cannabis Jobs.